Information

Lewis Hancock DD- 675 - History


Lewis Hancock
(DD-675 dp. 2,050; 1. 376'5"; b. 39'7"; dr. 17'9"; s. 3a.2 k.;cpl. 329; a. 5 5", 10 40mm., 7 20mm., 10 21" tt., 2 act., 6 dcp.; cl. Fletcher)

Lewis Hancock (DD-675) was laid down 31 March 1943 by Federal Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Kearny, N.J.; launched 1 August; sponsored by Lt. Joy Hancock, USNR, widow of Lieutenant Commander Hancock, and the first Wave officer to christen a U.S. combatant ship; and commissioned 29 September 1943, Comdr. Charles H. Lyman III in command.

Following shakedown out of Bermuda, Leslie Hancock in company with Langley (CVL-27) sailed from New York 6 December for the Pacific; arrived Pearl Harbor on Christmas Day 1943; and joined Vice Admiral Mitscher's TF 58, a mighty naval weapon organized to neutralize Japanese airpower and forward bases in advance of leapfrogging American amphibious operations. On 16 January 1944 Lewis Hancock sortied from Pearl Harbor with TG 58.2 for the invasion of the Marshall Islands. As~igned the task of neutralizing enemy airpower on Kwajalein Atoll, the flatops in Lewis Hancock's group smashed the airdrome at Roi on the 29th, destroying every Japanese plane. The next day a second carrier strike hit defensive positions softening enemy emplacements in preparation for landings on the 31st. For the next 3 days planes from the carriers provided close tactical support for the marines who wrested the atoll from the Japanese Emperor. The destroyer returned to Majuro Logoon on the 4th.

The destroyer accompanied the task force on the first strike against the Japanese naval base at Truk, 16 and 17 February. In this operation Mitscher's ships and planes destroyed several enemy warships, some 200,000 tons of merchant shipping, and about 275 planes.

Lewis Hancock- departed the Hawaiian Island 15 March for 5 months of action in the forward areas. After rejoining TG 58.2, she screened the heavies during a strike on the Palaus late in March and during the capture of Hollandia in April. In May they hit the Mareus-Wake area. On 11 June planes of the task force began the softening-up process against Saipan, Tinian, Guam, and other islands of the Marianas. Normally assigned antiaircraft and antisubmarine duties. Lewi' Hancock also bombarded Saipan on the 13th.

The Japanese attempted to counter the American thrust into the Marianas by striking at the invading task force with their full naval strength. The U.S. carriers, guarded by Lewis Hancock, smashed the enemy fleet in the Battle of the Philippine Sea 19 and 20 June, and thus saved the forces which were conquering the Marianas. Thereafter. the giant flattops continued to support operations in the .Marianas and in July raided the Bonins and the Palaus.

Following 2 weeks at Pearl Harbor, Lewis Hancock joined TF 38. Attacks on airstrips in the Philippines,Okinawa, and Formosa followed in rapid succession. On 13 September, during her first raid against the Philippines, Lewis Hancock splashed her first enemy plane. These airstrikes helped to neutralize Japan'a airpower and soften up her defenses for General MacArthur'a long-awaited return to the Philippines. troops landed on the beaches of Leyte, and Japan struck back with her full fleet in effort to stem the American advance. In the ensuing Battle of Leyte Gulf, while acting as a picket ship, Lewis Hancock assisted in sinking an enemy destroyer.

Joining the 5th Fleet in February 1945, she participated in a series of raids against the Japanese home islands striking Tokyo on the 16th and 25th and the Robe-Osaka area 19 March. During the later raid, DD-675 splashed her final enemy planes, numbers 5 and 6.

On 1 April the Navy placed the American flag on the doorstep of Japan with the landings on Okinawa. Lewis Hancock supported the struggle for that bitterly contested island until heading for home 10 May.

Miracously undamaged and having suffered only four casualties during 16 months in the Pacific, this veteran steamed into San Francisco 6 July. Released from drydock overhaul 30 August, Lewis Hancock was girding herself to return to the war when the Japanese surrendered. She arrived San Diego 7 September and decommissioned 10 January 1946.

The Korean war ended her retirement. On Armed Forces Day, 19 May 1951, she commissioned at the Naval Station Long Beach, Calif., Comdr. R. L. Tully in command. On il October she departed San Diego for the east coast and arrived Newport on the 27th for modernization.

Lewis Hancock departed Newport 6 September 1952, sailed through the Panama Canal, and reached Yokosuka Japan 20 October. After additional training, she entered Korean waters early in December. Following brief service on the east coast of Korea, she steamed to the embattled peninsula's west coast 18 December and operated with HMS Glory (CVL) for the remainder of the year. This Far Eastern deployment ended late in January 1953 when she departed Tokyo Bay for Newport via Southeast Asia, the Middle East, the Suez Canal and the Mediterranean. Her arrival at Newport completed a circumnavigation of the world.

Lewis Hancock now began a pattern of service a]ternating operations along the east coast w ith European deployments. In October she sailed for 4 months in European waters helping to strengthen the forces of Freedom which deterred Communist aggression against Western Europe. She sailed for home 24 January 1954 and operated along the Atlantic coast until heading back toward Europe in May 1955 for 4 months of joint operations with the British Home Fleet and operations with the Spanish Navy, before returning to Newport late in August.

The destroyer operated in the western Atlantic until the rising tension in the Middle East called her back to the volatile Mediterranean. The destroyer got underway 15 April 1956, transited the Suez Canal 9 May and operated in the Red Sea and Persian Gulf. She returned to the Mediterranean, one of the last ships to pass through the Suez Canal before it closed, and arrived home 14 August.

Following a period of refresher training and plane guard duty, Lewis Hancock departed Newport 6 May 1957, again heading east. In between 6th Fleet exercises the destroyer operated for 5 weeks in the Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, and Indian Ocean. Lewis Hancock concluded this last foreign cruise at Newport 31 August. She arrived at Philadelphia 24 September, decommissioned there 18 December 1957, and entered the Atlantic Reserve Fleet. Brought out of mothballs and modernized, Lewis Hancock was transferred to the government of Brazil on 1 August 1967, and was commissioned on the same day in the Brazilian Navy as Piaui (D 31).

Lewis Hancock received nine battle stars for World War II service, and two for Korean service.


DD-675 Lewis Hancock

Lewis Hancock (DD-675) 75) was laid down 31 March 1943 by Federal Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Kearny, N.J. launched 1 August sponsored by Lt. Joy Hancock, USNR (W), widow of Lieutenant Commander Hancock, and the first Wave officer to christen a U.S. combatant ship and commissioned 29 September 1943, Comdr. Charles H. Lyman III in command.

Following shakedown out of Bermuda, Lewis Hancock in company with Langley (CVL-27) sailed from New York 6 December for the Pacific arrived Pearl Harbor on Christmas Day 1943, and joined Vice Admiral Mitscher's TF 58, a mighty naval weapon organized to neutralize Japanese airpower and forward bases in advance of leapfrogging American amphibious operations. On 16 January 1944 Lewis Hancock sortied from Pearl Harbor with TO 58.2 for the invasion of the Marshall Islands. Assigned the task of neutralizing enemy airpower on Kwajalein Atoll, the flattops in Lewis Hancock's group smashed the airdrome at Roi on the 29th, destroying every Japanese plane. The next day a second carrier strike hit defensive positions softening enemy emplacements in preparation for landings on the 31st. For the next 3 days planes from the carriers provided close tactical support for the marines who wrested the atoll from the Japanese Emperor. The destroyer returned to Majuro Logoon on the 4th.

The destroyer accompanied the task force on the first strike against the Japanese naval base at Truk, 16 and 17 February. In this operation Mitscher's ships and planes destroyed several enemy warships, some 200,000 tons of merchant shipping, and about 275 planes.

Lewis Hancock departed the Hawaiian Island 15 March for 5 months of' action in the forward areas. After rejoining TG 58.2, she screened the heavies during a strike on the Palaus late in March and during the capture of Hollandia in April. In May they hit the Marcus-Wake area. On 11 June planes of the task force began the softening-up process against Saipan, Tinian, Guam, and other islands of the Marianas. Normally assigned antiaircraft and antisubmarine duties. Lewis Hancock also bombarded Saipan on the 13th.

The Japanese attempted to counter the American thrust into the Marianas by striking at the invading task force with their full naval strength. The U.S. carriers, guarded by Lewis Hancock, smashed the enemy fleet in the Battle of the Philippine Sea 19 and 20 June, and thus raved the forces which were conquering the Marianas. Thereafter. the giant flattops continued to support operations in the Marianas and in July raided the Bonins and the Palaus.

Following 2 weeks at Pearl Harbor, Lewis Hancock joined TF 38. Attacks on airstrips in the Philippines, Okinawa, and Formosa followed rapid succession. On 13 September, during her first raid against the Philippine, Lewis Hancock splashed her first enemy plane. These airstrikes helped to neutralize Japan's airpower and soften up her defenses for General MacArthur's long-awaited return to the Philippines. The U.S. troops landed on the beaches of Leyte, and Japan struck back with her full fleet in effort to stem the American advance. In the ensuing Battle Of Leyte Gulf, while acting as a picket ship, Lewis Hancock assisted in sinking an enemy destroyer.

Joining the 5th Fleet in February 1945, she participated in a series Of raids against the Japanese home islands striking Tokyo on the 16th and 25th and the Robe-Osaka area 19 March. During the later raid, DD-676 splashed her final enemy planes, numbers 5 and 6.

On 1 April the Navy placed the American flag on the doorstep of Japan with the landings on Okinawa. Lewis Hancock supported the struggle for that bitterly contested island until heading for home 10 May.

Miraculously undamaged and having suffered only four casualties during 16 months in the Pacific, this veteran steamed into San Francisco 6 July. Released from drydock overhaul 30 August, Lewis Hancock was girding herself to return to the war when the Japanese surrendered. She arrived San Diego 7 September and decommissioned 10 January 1946.

The Korean war ended her retirement. On Armed Forces Day, 19 May 1961, she recommissioned at the Naval Station Long Beach, Calif., Comdr. R. L. Tully in command. On 11 October she departed San Diego for the east coast and arrived Newport on the 27th for modernization.

Lewis Hancock departed Newport 6 September 1952, sailed through the Panama Canal, and reached Yokosuka, Japan 20 October. After additional training, she entered Korean waters early in December. Following brief service on the east coast of Korea, she steamed to the embattled peninsula's west coast 18 December and operated with HMS Glory (CVL) for the remainder of the year. This Far Eastern deployment ended late in January 1953 when she departed Tokyo Bay for Newport via Southeast Asia the Middle East, the Suez Canal and the Mediterranean. Her arrival at Newport completed a circumnavigation of the world. Lewis Hancock now began a pattern of service alternating operations along the east coast with European deployments. In October she sailed for 4 months in European waters helping to strengthen the forces of Freedom which deterred Communist aggression against Western Europe She sailed for home 24 January 1954 and operated along the Atlantic coast until heading back toward Europe in May 1955 for 4 months of joint operations with the British Home Fleet and operations with the Spanish Navy, before returning to Newport late in August.

The destroyer operated in the western Atlantic until the rising tension in the Middle East called her back to the volatile Mediterranean. The destroyer got underway 15 April 1956, transited the Suez Canal 9 May and operated in the Red Sea and Persian Gulf. She returned to the Mediterranean, one of the last ships to pass through the Suez Canal before it closed, and arrived home 14 August.

Following a period of refresher training and plane guard duty, Lewis Hancock departed Newport 6 May 1957, again heading east. In between 6th Fleet exercises the destroyer operated for 5 weeks in the Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, and Indian Ocean. Lewis Hancock concluded this last foreign cruise at Newport 31 August. She arrived at Philadelphia 24 September, decommissioned there 18 December 1957, and entered the Atlantic Reserve Fleet. Brought out of mothballs and modernized, Lewis Hancock was transferred to the government of Brazil on 1 August 1967, and was commissioned on the same day in the Brazilian Navy as Piaui (D-31). Stricken from the USN list 15 March 1973, she was sold to Brazil and served until stricken and scrapped in 1989.

Lewis Hancock received nine battle stars for World War II service, and two for Korean service.


Lewis Hancock DD- 675 - History

USS Lewis Hancock , a 2050-ton Fletcher class destroyer, was built at Kearny, New Jersey. Following her late September 1943 commissioning, she performed shakedown training in the vicinity of Bermuda and in December steamed to the Pacific to join the war against Japan. In her first combat operations, in February 1944, the new ship screened aircraft carriers during the invasion of Kwajalein and raids on Truk. She continued in this role as Task Force 58 struck enemy targets in the central Pacific and New Guinea during March-May and the Marianas campaign in June and July. She also used her five-inch guns to bombard Japanese positions on Saipan in mid-June and participated in the Battle of the Philippine Sea later in that month.

Beginning in September 1944 Lewis Hancock and her carrier group moved into the western Pacific in a series of attacks that led to the invasion of Leyte and the Battle of Leyte Gulf during October. In February and March 1945 she took part in raids on the Japanese home islands, and then was a participant in the fight to capture Okinawa. Overhauled on the West Coast in July and August 1945, Lewis Hancock was still in shipyard hands when the war ended and received no further active assignments before being decommissioned in January 1946.

Following a half-decade in the Pacific Reserve Fleet, in May 1951 the destroyer came back into commissioned service. That autumn Lewis Hancock joined the Atlantic Fleet, but between October 1952 and January 1953 went to the Far East for her only Korean War combat tour, a cruise that took her westward around the World. For the next four years she mainly served in the western Atlantic and Caribbean, with regular visits to European waters, but in 1956 and again in 1957 made longer deployment that took her through the Mediterranean Sea and Suez Canal to operate in the Red Sea, Indian Ocean and Persian Gulf.

Decommissioned for a second time in mid-December 1957, Lewis Hancock was part of the Atlantic Reserve Fleet for nearly another decade. In August 1967 she was loaned to Brazil and renamed Paiui . Formally sold to that nation in 1973, she remained part of the Brazilian Navy until 1989.

USS Lewis Hancock was named in honor of Lieutenant Commander Lewis Hancock, Jr. (1889-1925), who lost his life when the airship Shenandoah crashed on 3 September 1925.

This page features all the views we have concerning USS Lewis Hancock (DD-675).

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Underway circa 1951, soon after being recommissioned.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 108KB 740 x 615 pixels

Officers and crew members salute as the National Ensign is raised during recommissioning ceremonies at Long Beach Naval Station, California, on Armed Forces Day, 19 May 1951.
Participating in the ceremonies (though not visible in this photograph) was Lewis Hancock 's Sponsor, Captain Joy Bright Hancock, USN(W), Director of Women Personnel. The ship was named in honor of her late husband, Lieutenant Commander Lewis Hancock, Jr., USN, who lost his life when the airship USS Shenandoah (ZR-1) crashed on 3 September 1925.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 124KB 595 x 765 pixels

Installing the ship's repaired and rebalanced port propeller, while she was in dry dock during the 1950s.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 149KB 740 x 615 pixels

Laid up in the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, 8 September 1959.
Note chains used as mooring lines.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 96KB 740 x 615 pixels

Tending destroyers and patrol vessels at Sasebo, Japan.
Photo is dated 14 December 1952.
Ships nested along her port side include (left to right):
USS The Sullivans (DD-537)
USS McGowan (DD-678)
USS Lewis Hancock (DD-675) and
Korean frigate Imchin (# 66, ex USS Sausalito , PF-4)
Nest of five minesweepers in the left distance includes:
USS Heron (AMS-18)
USS Curlew (AMS-8)
USS Mockingbird (AMS-27)
USS Gull (AMS-16) and
USS Chatterer (AMS-40)

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 115KB 740 x 605 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Tending destroyers and patrol vessels at Sasebo, Japan.
Photo is dated 14 December 1952.
Ships nested along her port side include (left to right):
USS The Sullivans (DD-537)
USS McGowan (DD-678)
USS Lewis Hancock (DD-675) and
Korean frigate Imchin (# 66, ex USS Sausalito , PF-4)

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 120KB 740 x 625 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

The ship's sponsor, Lieutenant Joy Bright Hancock, USNR, prepares for the christening, during launching ceremonies at the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, Kearny, New Jersey, 1 August 1943.
The ship was named in honor of Lieutenant Hancock's late husband, Lieutenant Commander Lewis Hancock, USN, who was killed in the crash of USS Shenandoah (ZR-1) in 1925.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 110KB 605 x 765 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Jacket patch of the ship's insignia.

Courtesy of Captain G.F. Swainson, USN, 1970.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 160KB 650 x 675 pixels

Insignia: USS Lewis Hancock (DD-675)

This emblem was on file at the Naval Historical Center in 1968. It had probably been received during the 1950s.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 107KB 650 x 675 pixels

In addition to the images presented above, the National Archives appears to hold other views of USS Lewis Hancock (DD-675). The following list features some of these images:

The images listed below are NOT in the Naval Historical Center's collections.
DO NOT try to obtain them using the procedures described in our page "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions".

Reproductions of these images should be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system for pictures not held by the Naval Historical Center.


Our Newsletter

Product Description

USS Lewis Hancock DD 675

May - August 1957 Original Med Cruise Book

A great part of Naval history.

You would be purchasing the USS Lewis Hancock DD 675 cruise book during this time period.

Book Condition: Good condition for age. Pages are yellowing but all are intact and none are missing or written on. Some minor dings on the covers. Spine is tight.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • Ports of Call: Azores, Palma, Athens, Suez Canal, Aden, Bahrain, Port Said, Massawa, Italy, Barcelona and Gibtaltar.
  • Many Liberty Call Photos
  • Divisional Group Photos with Names
  • Inspections and Awards
  • Shipboard Life
  • Many Crew Activity Photos

Over 263 Photos on Approximately 66 Pages.

Once you view this book you will know what life was like on this Destroyer during this time period.

If you have any questions please send us an E-mail prior to purchasing.

Buyer pays shipping and handling. Shipping charges outside the US will vary by location.

Check our feedback. Customers who have purchased our products have been very pleased.


LEWIS HANCOCK DD 675

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Fletcher Class Destroyer
    Keel Laid March 31 1943 - Launched August 1 1943

Struck from Naval Register March 15 1973

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each name of the ship (for example, Bushnell AG-32 / Sumner AGS-5 are different names for the same ship so there should be one set of pages for Bushnell and one set for Sumner). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each name and/or commissioning period. Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


Navy Cross

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Lieutenant Commander Lewis Hancock, Jr., United States Navy, for distinguished service in the line of his profession in Command of the AL-4 during World War I. Under his command this vessel made numerous contacts with the enemy, and on one occasion attempted the dangerous feat of diving at a submerged enemy submarine to ram her.

Service: Navy
Division: U.S.S. AL-4


USS Lewis Hancock DD-675

Request a FREE packet and get the best information and resources on mesothelioma delivered to you overnight.

All Content is copyright 2021 | About Us

Attorney Advertising. This website is sponsored by Seeger Weiss LLP with offices in New York, New Jersey and Philadelphia. The principal address and telephone number of the firm are 55 Challenger Road, Ridgefield Park, New Jersey, (973) 639-9100. The information on this website is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended to provide specific legal or medical advice. Do not stop taking a prescribed medication without first consulting with your doctor. Discontinuing a prescribed medication without your doctor’s advice can result in injury or death. Prior results of Seeger Weiss LLP or its attorneys do not guarantee or predict a similar outcome with respect to any future matter. If you are a legal copyright holder and believe a page on this site falls outside the boundaries of "Fair Use" and infringes on your client’s copyright, we can be contacted regarding copyright matters at [email protected]


Tham khảo

  • Percival
  • Watson
  • Stevenson
  • Stockton
  • Thorn
  • Turner
  • DD-523 (Chᬊ đặt tên) – DD-525 (Chᬊ đặt tên)
  • DD-542 (Chᬊ đặt tên)
  • DD-543 (Chᬊ đặt tên)
  • DD-548 (Chᬊ đặt tên)
  • DD-549 (Chᬊ đặt tên)
  Hải quân Argentina   Hải quân Brasil
    (nguyên Guest) (nguyên Bennett) (nguyên Cushing) (nguyên Hailey) (nguyên Lewis Hancock) (nguyên Irwin) (nguyên Shields)
    (nguyên Wadleigh) (nguyên Rooks)
  • (Charles J. Badger đư𞸼 Hải quân Chile mua làm nguồn phụ tùng)
    (nguyên Anthony) (nguyên Ringgold) (nguyên Wadsworth) (nguyên Claxton) (nguyên Dyson) (nguyên Charles Ausburne)
    (nguyên Conner) (nguyên Zerstörer 2) (nguyên Hall) (nguyên Brown) (nguyên Zerstörer 3) (nguyên Aulick) (nguyên Bradford) (nguyên Charrette)
  • (ClaxtonDyson đư𞸼 Hải quân Hy Lạp mua làm nguồn phụ tùng)
    (nguyên Benham) (nguyên Isherwood)
  • (La ValletteTerry đư𞸼 Hải quân Peru mua làm nguồn phụ tùng)
    (nguyên Capps) (nguyên David W. Taylor) (nguyên Converse) (nguyên Jarvis) (nguyên McGowan)
    (nguyên Clarence K. Bronson) (nguyên Van Valkenburgh) (nguyên Cogswell) (nguyên Boyd) (nguyên Preston)

Tell your friends about Wikiwand!

Suggest as cover photo

Would you like to suggest this photo as the cover photo for this article?

Thank you for helping!

Your input will affect cover photo selection, along with input from other users.


Lewis Hancock DD- 675 - History

May - August 1957 Med Cruise Book

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will Exceed your Expectations

A great part of Naval history.

You would be purchasing the USS Lewis Hancock DD 675 cruise book during this time period. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • Ports of Call: Azores, Palma, Athens, Suez Canal, Aden, Bahrain, Port Said, Massawa, Italy, Barcelona and Gibtaltar.
  • Many Liberty Call Photos
  • Divisional Group Photos with Names
  • Inspections and Awards
  • Shipboard Life
  • Many Crew Activity Photos

Over 263 Photos on Approximately 66 Pages.

Once you view this book you will know what life was like on this Destroyer during this time period.


Mục lục

Lewis Hancock được đặt lườn tại xưởng tàu của hãng Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company ở Kearny, New Jersey vào ngày 31 tháng 3 năm 1943. Nó được hạ thủy vào ngày 1 tháng 8 năm 1943 được đỡ đầu bởi Trung úy Hải quân Dự bị Joy Hancock, vợ góa Thiếu tá Hancock, và là sĩ quan Wave đầu tiên đỡ đầu cho một tàu chiến của Hải quân Mỹ. Con tàu nhập biên chế vào ngày 29 tháng 9 năm 1943 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Trung tá Hải quân Charles H. Lyman III.

Thế Chiến II Sửa đổi

Sau khi hoàn tất chạy thử máy tại vùng biển Bermuda, Lewis Hancock cùng tàu sân bay Langley (CVL-27) khởi hành từ New York vào ngày 6 tháng 12 năm 1943 để đi sang khu vực Mặt trận Thái Bình Dương, đi đến Trân Châu Cảng vào ngày Giáng Sinh 25 tháng 12. Tại đây, nó gia nhập Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 58, lực lượng đặc nhiệm tàu sân bay nhanh dưới quyền Phó đô đốc Marc A. Mitscher trực thuộc Đệ Ngũ hạm đội.

1944 Sửa đổi

Lewis Hancock cùng Đội đặc nhiệm 58.2 khởi hành từ Trân Châu Cảng vào ngày 16 tháng 1 năm 1944 cho cuộc đổ bộ lên quần đảo Marshall. Đội tàu sân bay của nó được phân công nhiệm vụ vô hiệu hóa không lực đối phương trên đảo san hô Kwajalein, và đã ném bom xuống sân bay trên đảo Roi vào ngày 29 tháng 1, phá hủy mọi máy bay Nhật Bản tại đây. Một cuộc không kích từ tàu sân bay khác vào ngày hôm sau đã phá hủy các công trình phòng ngự nhằm chuẩn bị cho cuộc đổ bộ vào ngày 31 tháng 1. Trong ba ngày tiếp theo, máy bay từ tàu sân bay đã hỗ trợ gần mặt đất cho lực lượng Thủy quân Lục chiến chiến đấu trên hòn đảo này. Chiếc tàu khu trục quay trở về đảo vũng biển Majuro vào ngày 4 tháng 2.

Lewis Hancock tháp tùng lực lượng đặc nhiệm trong Chiến dịch Hailstone, cuộc không kích xuống Truk, căn cứ hải quân chủ lực của Nhật Bản tại khu vực Trung tâm Thái Bình Dương, tiến hành vào các ngày 16 và 17 tháng 2, nơi các máy bay và tàu chiến của đô đốc Mitscher đã đánh chìm nhiều tàu chiến và khoảng 200.000 t (200.000 tấn Anh 220.000 tấn thiếu) tải trọng tàu buôn đối phương, và khoảng 275 máy bay. Nó rời khu vực quần đảo Hawaii vào ngày 15 tháng 3 cho một lượt hoạt động kéo dài năm tháng nơi tuyến đầu và sau khi gia nhập trở lại Đội đặc nhiệm 58.2, nó hộ tống các tàu chiến hạng nặng cho đợt tấn công lên quần đảo Palau vào cuối tháng 3 và trong chiến dịch chiếm đóng Hollandia vào tháng 4. Sang tháng 5, Lực lượng tấn công lên khu vực các đảo Marcus và Wake. Vào ngày 11 tháng 6, máy bay của lực lượng đặc nhiệm đã không kích nhằm vô hiệu hóa hệ thống phòng thủ đối phương tại Saipan, Tinian, Guam cùng các đảo khác thuộc quần đảo Mariana. Ngoài các nhiệm vụ bảo vệ chống tàu ngầm và phòng không thường lệ, chiếc tàu khu trục còn tham gia bắn phá Saipan vào ngày 13 tháng 6.

Phía Nhật Bản tìm cách phản công cuộc đổ bộ lên quần đảo Mariana khi tấn công vào lực lượng đổ bộ bằng toàn bộ sức mạnh hải quân Lewis Hancock đã hộ tống các tàu sân bay khi máy bay của chúng đánh bại không lực trên tàu sân bay của Hạm đội Liên hợp Nhật Bản trong Trận chiến biển Philippine vào các ngày 19 tháng 6 và 20 tháng 6, nhờ vậy đã bảo vệ được lực lượng đổ bộ. Lực lượng đặc nhiệm tiếp tục hoạt động tại khu vực Mariana, rồi bắn phá quần đảo Bonin và Palau trong tháng 7.

Sau hai tuần lễ nghỉ ngơi và tiếp liệu tại Trân Châu Cảng, Lewis Hancock gia nhập Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 38 cho một loạt các cuộc không kích liên tục nối tiếp nhau xuống Philippines, Okinawa và Đài Loan. Những đợt tấn công này nhằm vô hiệu hóa không lực Nhật Bản và phá hủy các công trình phòng ngự để hỗ trợ cho cuộc đổ bộ lên Philippines của tướng Douglas MacArthur. Vào ngày 13 tháng 9, trong đợt không kích tại Philippines, chiếc tàu khu trục đã bắn rơi chiếc máy bay đối phương đầu tiên bằng hỏa lực phòng không. Khi lực lượng Hoa Kỳ bắt đầu đổ bộ lên Leyte, Hải quân Nhật Bản đã tung hầu hết mọi tàu chiến sẵn có trong một nỗ lực phản công. Trong trận Hải chiến vịnh Leyte diễn ra sau đó, trong vai trò tàu cột mốc canh phòng, đã trợ giúp vào việc đánh chìm một tàu khu trục đối phương.

1945 Sửa đổi

Gia nhập Đệ Ngũ hạm đội vào tháng 2 năm 1945, Lewis Hancock tham gia một loạt các cuộc không kích xuống các đảo chính quốc Nhật Bản, ném bom Tokyo vào các ngày 16 và 25 tháng 2, và xuống khu vực Kobe-Osaka vào ngày 19 tháng 3, nơi nó bắn rơi những máy bay đối phương cuối cùng, thứ năm và thứ sáu. Vào ngày 1 tháng 4, Đồng Minh tiếp tục đổ bộ lên Okinawa, và chiếc tàu khu trục lại hỗ trợ cho trận chiến cam go nhằm kiểm soát hòn đảo này, cho đến khi nó lên đường quay trở về nhà vào ngày 10 tháng 5.

Lewis Hancock về đến San Francisco vào ngày 6 tháng 7, được đưa vào ụ tàu để sửa chữa và đại tu. Tuy nhiên, Nhật Bản đầu hàng đã giúp kết thúc cuộc xung đột trước khi nó hoàn tất việc sửa chữa vào ngày 30 tháng 8. Trong suốt 16 tháng tham gia chiến đấu tại Mặt trận Thái Bình Dương, nó không bị hư hại nào và chỉ chịu đựng bốn thương vong. Con tàu đi đến San Diego vào ngày 7 tháng 9, nơi nó được cho xuất biên chế vào ngày 10 tháng 1 năm 1946.

1951 - 1957 Sửa đổi

Sự kiện Chiến tranh Triều Tiên nổ ra tại Viễn Đông đã làm gia tăng nhu cầu tăng cường lực lượng hải quân, và Lewis Hancock được cho nhập biên chế trở lại tại Long Beach, California vào ngày 19 tháng 5 năm 1951 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Trung tá Hải quân R. L. Tully. Nó rời San Diego vào ngày 11 tháng 10 để đi sang vùng bờ Đông, đi đến Newport, Rhode Island vào ngày 27 tháng 10 để được hiện đại hóa.

Lewis Hancock rời Newport vào ngày 6 tháng 9, 1952 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Trung tá Hải quân Myron Alpert, băng qua kênh đào Panama và đi đến Yokosuka, Nhật Bản vào ngày 20 tháng 10. Sau khi được huấn luyện bổ sung, nó tiến vào vùng biển Triều Tiên vào tháng 12, và sau khi phục vụ một thời gian ngắn bên bờ Đông bán đảo nó di chuyển sang vùng chiến sự bên bờ Tây bán đảo vào ngày 18 tháng 12, hoạt động cùng tàu sân bay Anh HMS Glory cho đến hết thời gian còn lại của năm đó. Chiếc tàu khu trục kết thúc lượt phục vụ tại Viễn Đông vào cuối tháng 1, 1953, khi nó rời vịnh Tokyo để quay về nhà, đi ngang qua Đông Nam Á, Trung Đông, kênh đào Suez và Địa Trung Hải, hoàn tất một vòng quanh thế giới khi về đến Newport.

Lewis Hancock sau đó luân phiên hoạt động tại vùng bờ Đông xen kẻ với những đợt bố trí sang Châu Âu. Nó lên đường vào tháng 10 cho bốn tháng hoạt động tại vùng biển Châu Âu, quay trở về nhà vào ngày 24 tháng 1, 1954 và hoạt động dọc theo bờ biển Đại Tây Dương, cho đến khi lại hướng sang Châu Âu vào tháng 5, 1955. Nó có những hoạt động phối hợp cùng Hạm đội Nhà Anh Quốc và Hải quân Tây Ban Nha trong bốn tháng cho đến khi quay trở về Newport vào cuối tháng 8. Căng thẳng gia tăng tại vùng Trung Đông khiến chiếc tàu khu trục lại lên đường vào ngày 15 tháng 4, 1956, băng qua kênh đào Suez vào ngày 9 tháng 5 để hoạt động tại Hồng Hải và vùng vịnh Péc-xích. Nó quay trở lại Địa Trung Hải, và là một trong số những con tàu cuốo cùng băng qua kênh đào Suez trước khi nó đóng lại, và về đến nhà vào ngày 14 tháng 8.

Sau một giai đoạn hoạt động tại chỗ, huấn luyện ôn tập và canh phòng máy bay, Lewis Hancock lại rời Newport hướng sang phía Đông vào ngày 6 tháng 5, 1957. Xen kẻ với những giai đoạn hoạt động cùng Đệ Lục hạm đội tại Địa Trung Hải, nó trải qua năm tháng hoạt động tại Hồng Hải, vịnh Aden và Ấn Độ Dương trước khi quay trở về Newport vào ngày 31 tháng 8. Chiếc tàu khu trục đi đến Xưởng hải quân Philadelphia vào ngày 24 tháng 9, nơi nó xuất biên chế vào ngày 18 tháng 12, 1957 và đưa về Hạm đội Dự bị Đại Tây Dương.

CT Piaui (D-31) Sửa đổi

Sau khi được hiện đại hóa, Lewis Hancock được chuyển cho Brazil vào ngày 1 tháng 8, 1967, và nhập biên chế cùng Hải quân Brazil như là chiếc CT Piaui (D 31). Nó ngừng hoạt động và bị tháo dỡ vào năm 1989.

Lewis Hancock được tặng thưởng chín Ngôi sao Chiến trận do thành tích phục vụ trong Thế Chiến II, và thêm hai Ngôi sao Chiến trận trong Chiến tranh Triều Tiên.


Watch the video: GT SPORT - Lewis Hamilton Time Trial Challenge - Dragon Trail - 1 (January 2022).