Information

Renate Müller


Renate Müller was born in Munich, Germany, on 26th April 1906. She became an actress and made several films including Love in the Ring (1930), The Son of the White Mountain (1930), Darling of the Gods (1930), Flute Concert of Sans-Souci (1931), The Office Girl (1931), The Little Escapade (1931), When Love Sets the Fashion (1932) and Cairo Season (1932).

Müller meet Adolf Hitler while making a film on location near the Danish coast in the autumn of 1932. He watched the shooting all day and in the evening visited the house where she was staying. She later told the film director, Adolf Zeissler: "He sat there, not moving at all, looking at me all the time, and then he'd take my hand in his and look some more. He talked all the time - just nonsense."

Ronald Hayman, the author of Hitler and Geli (1998): "After this he arranged frequent meetings with her, and the jewellery he gave her included a diamond bracelet more valuable than any of his presents to Geli and Eva Braun. But the demands he made were as unpalatable to her as to Geli. One night, for instance, at the Chancellery, he began by going into detail about Gestapo methods of torture, comparing them with medieval techniques. After they had both taken their clothes off he lay on the floor, begging her to hit him and kick him. She refused, but he went on heaping accusations on his own head, saying he was her slave, unworthy to be in the same room. Eventually giving in, she started to kick him, abuse him with obscene words and hit him with his whip. Becoming increasingly excited, Hitler started to masturbate. After his orgasm, he suggested quietly that they should both put their clothes on. They drank a glass of wine together and chatted about trivialities. Finally he stood up, kissed her hand, thanked her for a pleasant evening and rang for a servant to show her out."

Renate Müller gained permission from Adolf Hitler to visit London. It has been claimed that the Gestapo "kept her under surveillance while she was there, and after spending a lot of time with a former lover, Frank Deutsch, who was Jewish, she found, on returning to Germany, that she had been blacklisted". She also heard rumours that suggested she was going to be put on trial for "race defamation". Her friends claim that under this pressure she became addicted to morphine.

According to Cate Haste, the author of Nazi Women (2001): "With her career in ruins, she became addicted to morphine and was sent to a sanatorium. Having asked for, and been refused, permission to see Hitler in 1936, she returned to the sanatorium."

On 1st October 1937 Renate Müller was looking out of a window when a car pulled up outside the sanatorium and four SS officers got out. In a state of panic she jumped out of the window and was killed.

Renate Miiller... met Hitler in the autumn of 1932 when she was filming on location near the Danish coast. He watched the shooting all day, and, in the evening, visited the house where she was staying, but his behaviour, when they were together, was distinctly odd. At forty-three, he still seemed ill at ease when alone with a glamorous woman. "He sat there, not moving at all, looking at me all the time, and then he'd take my hand in his and look some more. He talked all the time - just nonsense." Later, when she was invited to a party at the Chancellery, he ignored her until everyone was leaving but then took her arm, offering to show her round the building. He pointed out the changes he had made and took her to his wardrobe, where he brought out his tail-coated dinner shirt, saying he had never worn evening dress till he came to power.

After this he arranged frequent meetings with her, and the jewellery he gave her included a diamond bracelet more valuable than any of his presents to Geli and Eva Braun. She refused, but he went on heaping accusations on his own head, saying he was her slave, unworthy to be in the same room.

Eventually giving in, she started to kick him, abuse him with obscene words and hit him with his whip. Finally he stood up, kissed her hand, thanked her for a pleasant evening and rang for a servant to show her out.

When she wanted to take a holiday in London, she asked his permission, which was granted, but the Gestapo kept her under surveillance while she was there, and after spending a lot of time with a former lover, Frank Deutsch, who was Jewish, she found, on returning to Germany, that she had been blacklisted, and it was rumoured that she was to be put on trial for "race defamation". While under this pressure, she became addicted to morphine. Eventually she went into a sanatorium and, after being discharged, asked for an interview with Hitler, who refused to see her. Back in the sanatorium, she was looking out of the window one day when a car pulled up in the street below, and four SS officers got out. She killed herself by jumping out of the window. She was thirty.

Had she survived, she could possibly have been dangerous to Hitler in the same way as Geli could: either of them could have damaged him by revealing the truth about his sexual habits. In 1937, when her death was reported in the German papers, they revealed neither that Hitler had known her nor that she had killed herself. According to the Volkischer Beobachter, it had been known for some time that she was "no longer in the best of health". Hitler did not attend the cremation, but Goebbels sent a wreath.

For some women, it ended in disaster. The glamorous actress Renate Muller met him in 1932, when he spent a day watching the shooting of her latest film. When he visited her in the evening, she found his behaviour distinctly odd, according to the account she later gave to director Adolf Zeissler, which he published in a magazine, and was later used as a source in the American OSS report about Hitler's sexual perversions. He talked all the time - just nonsense.'' She was invited to a party at the Chancellery, at the end of which Hitler offered to show her round the building, including his wardrobe of clothes. He arranged frequent meetings and sent her expensive jewels, until one night he took her to his rooms, where, allegedly after a discussion about methods of torture, she claimed she was required to kick and beat him, while he declared himself her slave. After he had excited himself to orgasm, he suggested that they put their clothes on, and they drank a glass of wine and chatted, until he stood up, kissed her hand, and thanked her for a pleasant evening. The reliability of the source, as with the whole OSS report, is however open to question.

Muller's subsequent history was tragic. Allegedly with Hitler's permission, she took a holiday in London, where she spent some time with a former lover who was Jewish, despite being trailed, she believed, by the Gestapo. On her return, she was blacklisted, and rumours circulated that she was to be put on trial for "race defamation" having a relationship with a Jew. With her career in ruins, she became addicted to morphine and was sent to a sanatorium. Having asked for, and been refused, permission to see Hitler in 1936, she returned to the sanatorium, but when she saw a car pull up outside, and four SS men get out, she killed herself by throwing herself out of a window. Goebbels sent a wreath to her funeral. Renate Muller was another addition to the tally of women around Hitler who committed suicide.


Library History Seminar XIV: Libraries Without Borders

Library History Seminar XIV: Libraries Without Borders will take place virtually Thursday, June 10-Saturday, June 12, 2021, and include concurrent research sessions relating to the conference theme.

Keynote address, “'The Hill We Climb': Towards Equity and Inclusion in Library and Information Science," will be delivered by Dr. Renate Chancellor, Chair and Associate Professor, Department of Library Science, Catholic University of America.

Additional panels open to all conference participants include:

  • Short-Form Library History: Writing Book Reviews, Blog Posts, and Newsletter Articles
  • Getting Your Historical Research Published: Journal Editors Tell All (or Most!)
  • Getting Started with Research: Biographical, Institutional, and International
  • Writing Library History for General Audiences: Q&A with Children’s Nonfiction Authors.

Schedule of concurrent research sessions to come. Visit our conference website: https://sites.google.com/oakland.edu/libhistsem.

Registered participants will be sent a link to the conference in June 2021.


Out of your control

The drivers of change are largely out of our control. Take demographics. For the first time in history, companies are now employing up to five generations simultaneously. Globally, generation Z and millennials – with their rather different career needs and aspirations – will soon dominate the workforce. Work patterns are changing, with more people working from home or on the road or in flexible arrangements. In a globalized world, more people are working across geographies and many teams are international. Technological innovation and changing customer expectations underpin the need for continuous business transformation. The boundaries between sectors and functions are blurring. Networks play bigger role in the workplace.

In this rapidly changing environment, companies need to adapt if they want to remain attractive employers, and hence relevant and competitive. Leaders are pivotal. Leadership can influence levels of employee engagement, for good or for ill, by up to 70%. It is critical for the success of any company.


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Tamron Hall and her family, including her sister’s two sons Damion and Leroy, were devastated by domestic violence when her sister Renate was killed and they were left with guilt and questions about what they should have done. Tamron recognized the importance of raising awareness for families who have loved ones experiencing abuse, and that is why she has created “The Tamron ♥ Renate Fund” to support Safe Horizon in helping victims and their families.

Renate, a mother of two, was murdered in 2004 after years of relationships with abusive men. “My sister’s death was ruled a homicide, ” Hall said. “Blunt force trauma to the back of the head. A few months prior to her death I witnessed a violent confrontation where my sister was injured, but ultimately, no one was ever charged in her homicide or in her murder and no suspect was named. My sister’s case has led me to focus a lot of my attention on domestic violence. We don’t know what happened in her case, what I do know is that she was found in a swimming pool in the back of her home, face down, and it was ruled a homicide. My journey to speak out on domestic violence was based on conversations that I had with my sister.”

Join Tamron in supporting Safe Horizon’s domestic violence programs so that women and men like Renate can find support as well as a place for friends and family to find resources.

For many survivors of violence, the journey to safety and healing starts with a simple phone call to Safe Horizon’s Hotline. The Hotline advocates offer personalized, non-judgmental support, can provide information about resources in your community, and connect you to Safe Horizon programs and services. In fact, 80 percent of New York City domestic violence shelter residents are placed through Safe Horizon’s Hotline.

“We’re stronger when there are people who are willing to stand with you and hold your hand, whether in court if it comes to that, in finding a new home or a school for your child and, if needed, a temporary place to call home – a shelter for you and your children. There is somebody willing to stand with you. You just have to open your heart and tell them. I loved my sister Renate and I’ve been given the opportunity to honor her memory while making the difference in the lives of victims of domestic violence. Please join me.” — Tamron Hall


For every start, and every step, there’s a Prenate ®

Every woman’s pregnancy journey is unique, with individual preferences and needs. Wherever you are on that journey, from trying to become pregnant to joys of your new baby, Prenate ® is here to support you and your health with advanced nutritional support that is customized for the particular needs of every stage of this beautiful and life-changing adventure.

Helping you get what you want and need at every step

Your vitamin and mineral needs increase and vary during pregnancy, so it’s important to consider your options for nutritional support to give your baby a good start in life. Even a healthy diet may not be able to give all the nutrients that are important to a pregnancy, at every stage. Therefore, it is important that you talk to your doctor about nutritional support options, like Prenate ® vitamins, which are formulated specifically to meet the varying needs of pregnancy. Prenate ® Vitamin Family incorporates USP pharmaceutical grade ingredients that provide patients the quality and purity that are important for prenatal nutritional support.

And it’s important to begin taking a prenatal vitamin supplement before you become pregnant, as they contain folic acid. Folic acid supports neural and brain formation in the earliest weeks of pregnancy. 18-20

From Start to Finish – Prenate ® !

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. 
THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE, OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE.

*Most eligible patients will pay no more than $20 per copay. For each Prenate ® prescription, pay the first $20 of your out-of-pocket expense and Prenate ® will cover up to $75 of your remaining expense. You could have additional responsibility depending on your insurance plan or remaining expense. This offer is good for 12 uses.

REFERENCES: 1. Nestabs ® prescribing information, Women’s Choice Pharmaceuticals website. http://www.wcpharma.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/ nestabs.pdf. Undated. Accessed April 20, 2015. 2. NataChew ® prescribing information, Eckson Labs, Sep 2012. 3. Prenate Pixie ® prescribing information, Avion Pharmaceuticals, LLC, Jan 2015. 4. Vitafol ® Nano prescribing information, Everett Laboratories, Inc, Mar 2014. 5. Prenate Mini ® prescribing information, Avion Pharmaceuticals, LLC, Dec 2014-03. 6. Vitafol ® Ultra prescribing information, Everett Laboratories, Inc, Sep 2013. 7. Vitafol ® One prescribing information, Everett Laboratories, Inc, Oct 2012. 8. OB Complete™ Petite prescribing information, Vertical Pharmaceuticals, LLC, Sep 2014. 9. Prenate ® Enhance prescribing information, Avion Pharmaceuticals, LLC, Sep 2013. 10. Prenate ® Restore prescribing information, Avion Pharmaceuticals, LLC, Sep 2013. 11. CitraNatal Harmony ® prescribing information, Mission Pharmacal Co, Jun 2014. 12. Nexa ® Plus prescribing information, Vertical Pharmaceuticals, LLC, Apr 2014. 13. OB Complete™ ONE prescribing information, Vertical Pharmaceuticals, LLC, Sep 2014. 14. Concept™ DHA prescribing information, US Pharmaceutical Corp, Jul 2009. 15.Data on File/A, Avion Pharmaceuticals, LLC, Alpharetta, GA. 16. CitraNatal ® DHA prescribing information, Mission Pharmacal Co, Nov 2012. 17. SelectOB ® +DHA prescribing information, Everett Laboratories, Inc, Mar 2014. 18. Czeizel AE, Dudás I, Paput L, Bánhidy F. Prevention of neural-tube defects with periconceptional folic acid, methylfolate, or multivitamins? Ann Nutr Metab. 2011 58(4):263–271. 19. ACOG. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Practice Bulletin No. 44: Neural tube defects. Obstet Gynecol. 2003 102(1):203-213. 20. Nelson A. Folates for reduction of risk of neural tube defects: using oral contraceptives as a source of folate. Open Access J Contracept. 2011 2:137–150.

PRENATE ® , Prenate Mini ® , Prenate Pixie ® , Prenate ® Enhance, Prenate ® Restore, Prenate Chewable ® , Prenate DHA ® , Prenate Elite ® , and Prenate Essential ® are registered trademarks of Avion Pharmaceuticals, LLC. All rights reserved.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

WARNING: Accidental overdose of iron-containing products is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children under 6. Keep this product out of reach of children. In case of accidental overdose, call a doctor or poison control center immediately.

WARNING: Ingestion of more than 3 grams of omega-3 fatty acids (such as DHA) per day has been shown to have potential antithrombotic effects, including an increased bleeding time and International Normalized Ratio (INR). Administration of omega-3 fatty acids should be avoided in patients taking anticoagulants and in those known to have an inherited or acquired predisposition to bleeding.

This site and its contents are an information resource only, and are neither intended to nor should be used in replacement of your doctor or other prescribing professional’s medical guidance, recommendations or advice. Neither this site nor its information should be used or relied upon for any diagnostic, medical, treatment, nutritional or other purpose. All aspects of pregnancy, including whether pregnancy is right for you, and the nourishment and care of your child, should be made with your doctor and other appropriate medical professional, and in consideration of your and your child’s particular medical history. Avion Pharmaceuticals, LLC (“Avion”) makes no representation, warranty or other undertaking that this site or its information are appropriate for you or your child’s specific needs or issues, and further expressly disclaims all damages, losses, injuries or liability whatsoever incurred or alleged to have been incurred in consequence of your reliance on the information on this site. Avion does not endorse any test, procedure, treatment, remedy, therapy, cure, nutritional regimen, method or other activity or undertaking that you and/or your doctor or other medical professional may elect or recommend. By visiting this site you agree to these terms and conditions and acknowledge that you have read and understand the same. These terms and conditions, together with any information on this site, may be amended, restated or otherwise changed from time to time and at any time by Avion within the sole, absolute and uncontrolled exercise of its discretion. You acknowledge and agree that Avion has no duty or obligation to keep you informed of any amendments to, restatements of or other changes to these terms and conditions or this site, and that you are solely and exclusively responsible for apprising yourself of the same.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

WARNING: Accidental overdose of iron-containing products is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children under 6. Keep this product out of reach of children. In case of accidental overdose, call a doctor or poison control center immediately.

WARNING: Ingestion of more than 3 grams of omega-3 fatty acids (such as DHA) per day has been shown to have potential antithrombotic effects, including an increased bleeding time and International Normalized Ratio (INR). Administration of omega-3 fatty acids should be avoided in patients taking anticoagulants and in those known to have an inherited or acquired predisposition to bleeding.

This site and its contents are an information resource only, and are neither intended to nor should be used in replacement of your doctor or other prescribing professional’s medical guidance, recommendations or advice. Neither this site nor its information should be used or relied upon for any diagnostic, medical, treatment, nutritional or other purpose. All aspects of pregnancy, including whether pregnancy is right for you, and the nourishment and care of your child, should be made with your doctor and other appropriate medical professional, and in consideration of your and your child’s particular medical history. Avion Pharmaceuticals, LLC (“Avion”) makes no representation, warranty or other undertaking that this site or its information are appropriate for you or your child’s specific needs or issues, and further expressly disclaims all damages, losses, injuries or liability whatsoever incurred or alleged to have been incurred in consequence of your reliance on the information on this site. Avion does not endorse any test, procedure, treatment, remedy, therapy, cure, nutritional regimen, method or other activity or undertaking that you and/or your doctor or other medical professional may elect or recommend. By visiting this site you agree to these terms and conditions and acknowledge that you have read and understand the same. These terms and conditions, together with any information on this site, may be amended, restated or otherwise changed from time to time and at any time by Avion within the sole, absolute and uncontrolled exercise of its discretion. You acknowledge and agree that Avion has no duty or obligation to keep you informed of any amendments to, restatements of or other changes to these terms and conditions or this site, and that you are solely and exclusively responsible for apprising yourself of the same.


When German Immigrants Were America’s Undesirables

In a recent interview, White House chief of staff John Kelly told NPR that undocumented immigrants are “not people that would easily assimilate into the United States, into our modern society.” And he listed a few reasons why:

“They’re overwhelmingly rural people,” he said. “In the countries they come from, fourth-, fifth-, sixth-grade educations are kind of the norm. They don’t speak English … They don’t integrate well they don’t have skills.”

Kelly was talking specifically about immigrants from Latin American countries. But a century before, this line of thinking was used against another group that didn’t seem to be able to 𠇊ssimilate”: German Americans.

At the time, these roughly eight million Americans were the country’s largest non-English-speaking group. Many had come over in a migration wave in the late 19th century. Once here, they built restaurants and guesthouses that, in the German tradition, each had their own beer brewery. In 1910, the U.S. had 554 German-language newspapers, as well as German-language school systems that coexisted with English-language schools.

𠇋y 1917 these immigrants who came to Cincinnati or St. Louis or Milwaukee or New York or Baltimore were fully integrated into American society,” says Richard E. Schade, a German studies professor at the University of Cincinnati. But when the U.S. entered World War I, these immigrants came up against a new 𠇊nti-German hysteria.”

World War I propaganda poster from the US intelligence office 𠆍on’t talk, the web is spun for you with invisible threads, keep out of it, help to destroy it, spies are listening,’ showing Kaiser Wilhelm II as the spider. (Credit: Photo12/UIG/Getty Images)

Because Germany was one of America’s adversaries in the war, many Anglo-Americans began to fear that German Americans were still loyal to the Kaiser, or German emperor. Suddenly, German Americans became “hyphenated Americans” who suspiciously practiced their own traditions instead of 𠇊ssimilating” into Anglo-American culture. As President Woodrow Wilson once admonished: 𠇊ny man who carries a hyphen about with him, carries a dagger that he is ready to plunge into the vitals of this Republic when he gets ready.”

With the war, German Americans became a perceived security threat. They also got a new nickname.

“The number one American term for Germans in the first world war w[as] ‘the Huns,’” Schade says. “The Huns in the Middle Ages swept into the plains of what is now Russia and invaded Europe, and that term became associated with the Germans.” According to this stereotype, German Americans were 𠇊 race of barbaric raiders” who spoke a language other Americans couldn’t understand.

A US Government poster showing a refugee with a baby fleeing from a shadowy and threatening figure of a German soldie, 1918. (Credit: MPI/Getty Images)

All of this anti-German sentiment did two things. First, it motivated Anglo-Americans to push back against anything German. States banned German-language schools and removed German books from libraries. Some German Americans were interned, and one German American man, who was also targeted for being socialist, was killed by a mob.


Rocketman: Elton John’s Forgotten 1984 Wedding to Renate Blauel

February 14 1984 : Elton John and Renate Blauel at St. Mark’s Church. By Patrick Riviere/Getty Images.

“It was Valentine’s Day, and Elton John was making one last attempt at being heterosexual,” wrote the Daily Australian, reflecting on the musician’s 1984 wedding to Renate Blauel. The nuptials, which are briefly recreated in the musical biopic Rocketman, came as a shock to most of the world by that point in John’s megawatt career, the musician had shared a five-year romance with his manager John Reid and revealed he was bisexual in a 1976 interview with Rolling Stone. But he had also explained, “I’d rather fall in love with a woman eventually because I think a woman probably lasts much longer than a man.”

John had met Blauel, a German-born sound engineer, while working on his Too Low for Zero album. After knowing each other about 18 months, John proposed over curry at an Indian restaurant in Sydney, and the couple married the following week—at a church in the nearby suburb of Darling Point. “I simply want to be a family man,” John explained at the time. “And I’m not getting any younger.” John and Blauel managed to pull together an extravagant affair in a matter of days, thanks to John’s tour promoter at the time, Harley Medcalf.

“Oysters were flown in from New Zealand,” Medcalf told Page Six of the last-minute preparations and decadent menu, which included lobster, prawns, scallops, salmon, and a 1978 Le Montrachet Chateau des Hebeaux Jacques Prieur. Blauel wore a gown with a heart-shaped pendant containing 63 diamonds—a gift from her groom—sewn into the bodice. John, meanwhile, wore a lavender silk shirt and white coat.

“He’s the nicest guy I’ve ever met,” Blauel was quoted as saying, ahead of the wedding, by the United Press International. “I’ve heard all sorts of stories about Elton and that he’s supposed to be bisexual, but that doesn't worry me.” Guests reportedly included Olivia Newton-John and John McEnroe, while John’s manager and ex-boyfriend John Reid served as best man.

The marriage only lasted four years, and when the couple announced their divorce, People reported that Blauel and Elton “genuinely intend to remain best of friends.” Contrary to the couple’s hope, however, John confessed in the 1997 documentary Tantrums and Tiaras that they had remained anything but. “I hope one day that we can meet and be friends,” he said. “We haven’t been in touch, we’ve had no contact at all which is very sad, but she wants it that way. I don’t have any negative things to say about her at all."

In a 1992 interview with the Los Angeles Times, John attributed the marriage to his alcohol and drug addiction: ”Even though I knew I was gay, I thought this woman was attractive and that being married would cure me of everything wrong in my life. . .When you take that amount [of drugs and alcohol], you can’t have any relationship.” In a 1996 interview with the New Yorker, he recalled once guzzling eight vodka martinis in 30 minutes, blacking out, and awaking to be told he had gotten into a fist fight with John Reid. He was also deep into cocaine addiction—eventually building up a habit that, at its worst, saw him reportedly taking it every four minutes. Of his decision to marry Blauel, John told the New Yorker, “When you take a lot of drugs, and you’re out to lunch half the time. . . you think a change of scenery, I’ll get another house, I’ll move to another country.”

In a 2007 interview with the Sydney Morning Herald, John further explained, “A drug addict thinks like this: ‘I’ve had enough boyfriends and that’s not made me happy, so I’ll have a wife that will change everything.’ And I loved Renate. She’s a great girl. I ­really, really loved her. But, you know. It is one of the things I regret most in my life, hurting her.” He also shared that he and Blauel had, at long last, reunited.

“We laughed and we cried,” John said. “We’re adults. But I do regret [having hurt her].” He also said, “She was the classiest woman I’ve ever met, but it wasn’t meant to be. I was living a lie.”

In 2017, while performing a series of concerts in Australia for his Once in a Lifetime tour, John shared a candid Instagram post recalling his doomed first wedding.


Watch the video: Renate Müller - Just Because I Lost My Heart To You Filmszene: Sunshine Susie 1931 (December 2021).