Information

Missouri Western State University


Located in St. Joseph, Missouri, Missouri Western State University serves as an economical, cultural, and educational resource for the entire community. It offers an exceptional learning environment that prepares students for meaningful personal lives, and professional accomplishments.Since its founding in 1915, the university has been committed to the higher education needs of its constituencies.It was started as St. Joseph Junior College to provide a two-year liberal arts transfer program.Later, in 1969, it became a four-year college. It joined the State of Missouri system in 1977.In August 2005, it gained university status and changed its name to Missouri Western State University.Accredited by the Commission on Institutions of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the campus provides a blend of traditional liberal arts and sciences and career-oriented associate and baccalaureate degree programs.The state-supported institution also offers certificate programs, professional programs, programs for transfer students, continuing education opportunities, and self-enrichment courses.With a beautifully landscaped campus, the university provides facilities such as an art gallery, the center for academic support, center for multicultural education, center for student activities, counseling center, fitness center, health center, instructional media center, theater, Spratt stadium/club, and testing center.The Missouri Western State University Library, on the second and third floors of the Hearnes Center, maintains more than 202,000 volumes and subscribes to 1500 journals.The special collections area includes the MWSU Archives and 1850-1950 collection of primary source and published documents.Disability services and financial aid are offered to eligible students.


History

A degree in History prepares students for careers in government, public service, business industry, archives, museums and historical preservation as well as writing and research.

As a history major at Northwest, students become familiar with the human experience and determine how history fits into the context of the world. Students will study the evolution of the earliest man to the present day, as well as events and values as well as causes and effects that determine how the world has been shaped. At Northwest, students are taught to become critical thinkers who study evidence in order to obtain a conclusion and communicate that information in clear, concise methods.  

Professors offer relatively small classes and close interaction with students. Additionally, all upper-level courses are taught by University instructors rather than graduate assistants.


History (HIS)

Course Description: A survey of the political, social, and economic history of the world (Europe, Africa, Middle East, India, Far East, and Latin America) from 1815 to the present.

CORE 42: MOTR HIST 202 World History II

HIS 140 American History to 1865 Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: The discovery of America to the end of the Civil War colonial America, the Revolution, national development, sectionalism, and the Civil War.

CORE 42: MOTR HIST 101 American History I

HIS 150 American History since 1865 Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Continuation of HIS 140. Reconstruction, industrialization, urbanization, emergence as a world power, progressivism, World War I, the New Deal, World War II, and postwar America.

CORE 42: MOTR HIST 102 American History II

HIS 200 Ancient and Medieval Civilization Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: The western world from antiquity to the fifteenth century the emergence of civilization in the Nile and Tigris-Euphrates valleys the political, social, economic, and intellectual contributions of Greece, Rome, and medieval Europe.

CORE 42: MOTR WCIV 101 Western Civilization I

HIS 210 Early Modern Civilization Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: The western world from 1500 to 1815 national states, the geographical revolution, the founding of European oversee empires, the Reformation, the emergence of constitutional governments, the Scientific Revolution, and the American French Revolutions.

CORE 42: MOTR WCIV 102 Western Civilization II

HIS 220 History of Missouri Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Missouri under French and Spanish rule the American acquisition the role of the state in the slavery crisis and in the settlement of the West the state's contributions to politics, art, literature, education, industry, and transportation.

HIS 230 Modern Europe: 1789 to the Present Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: The French Revolution and Napoleonic periods reaction, nationalism, and revolution rise of socialism imperialism World War I the Russian Revolutions and Soviet communism the rise of fascism Hitler, Stalin, and World War II the Holocaust the postwar bi-polar world order the bloc system.

CORE 42: MOTR WCIV 102 Western Civilization II

HIS 235 Historic Preservation Field School Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Intensive field experience in documenting and preserving an existing built environment as well as the historic landscape. Students actively participate in a survey of an urban neighborhood. Class sessions consist of lecture, discussion, field work, and lab. Lecture and discussion cover a wide array of issues in historic preservation. Field work includes tours, inspection, photography, and documentation of historic buildings. This course may be taken more than once for credit as an elective, but only once to fulfill a requirement for the major in either the B.A. or B.S. program in History.

HIS 245 History of the Middle East in the Twentieth Century Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: An examination of the historical developments in the Middle East since 1900, with special attention to the origins of current political, social, and economic issues in a region plagued by instability.

HIS 290 The Historian's Craft Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring.

Course Description: This course introduces students to the methods used by historians to analyze, interpret, and write about the past. Students will learn basic skills which may include, but are not limited to: locating and assessing source material analyzing primary and secondary sources writing analytical, comparative, historiographical, and review essays conducting oral interviews conducting oral presentations reviewing movies. Various thematic approaches will be offered. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140 or HIS 150, and HIS 200 or HIS 210 or HIS 230, and ENG 104, and must be a declared major or minor in history.

HIS 300 American Colonial History Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: The founding of North American colonies by Spain, France, and Great Britain cross-cultural interactions between Europeans and Native Americans race and slavery religious diversity economic growth imperial conflicts British colonial administration and the path to Revolution. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140 and HIS 150, and a grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 301 Early National Period Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: Transition from colonial settings to constitutional republic birth of political parties Jeffersonian republicanism Native American conflicts race and slavery women's expanded opportunities War of 1812 economic growth and transportation innovations Jacksonian democracy. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140 and HIS 150, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 302 Antebellum America Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Postwar expansion rise of American nationalism and the growth of the West revival of the two-party system Jacksonian democracy humanitarian crusades the Mexican War. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140 and HIS 150, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 305 The American Frontier Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Westward expansion of the United States over three centuries colonial frontier, trans-Appalachian frontier, trans-Mississippi frontier significance of the frontier in American history. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140 and HIS 150, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 306 American Women's History Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: This course provides an introduction to the study of women in American history from the colonial era through the 20th century, with particular emphasis on the everyday experiences of ordinary women, including women's work, family life, religious experiences, health, and sexuality. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140 and HIS 150, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 308 African American History Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: This course surveys major themes in African American History starting with enslavement through the Long Civil Rights movement of the 20th century. Will focus on how freedom expanded and contracted for African Americans as well as the various strategies of protest and self-expression they used to gain equality and justice. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140 and HIS 150, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 310 English History to 1688 Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (even-numbered years).

Course Description: An examination of major facts and interpretations of the history of England from the Roman era through the Glorious Revolution emphasis on political events, social institutions, and cultural developments that shaped the ancient, medieval, and early modern English past. Prerequisite(s): HIS 200 and HIS 210, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 311 Race, Science, Medicine Am His Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: This course explores the complex relationship of medicine and science in the construction of race in American history. Will explore the concept of race in early anthropology, monogenism and polygenism, enslavement, eugenics, and the rise of IQ and DNA testing among other topics. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140 and HIS 150, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 320 English History since 1688 Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: An examination of major facts and interpretations of the history of England from the Glorious Revolution to the present emphasis on evolution of parliamentary government and the rise and decline of the British Empire. Prerequisite(s): HIS 210 and HIS 230, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 325 American Economic History Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: English mercantilism, laissez-faire and its effect on American economic development, the emergence of the corporation and the trust, the issue of government regulation, and the role of the government in the economy of today. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140 and HIS 150, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 330 Recent United States History Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: United States since 1945 wartime mobilization rise of American hegemony Cold War anticommunism Civil rights suburbanization gender politics cultural rebellions Great Society Conservative ascendency Globalization war on terror, Great Recession. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140 and HIS 150, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 334 Selected Topics in Ancient History Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: This course will study the political narrative as well as the intellectual, religious and social history of the cultures that defined the ancient Mediterranean world. Each semester it is offered will focus on one of the following: Ancient Middle East, Ancient Greece, Ancient Rome, or another ancient topic. In addition to learning the political and social events of these cultures, students will read and discuss a number of primary sources from these civilizations focusing on their indigenous meaning as well as their impact on Western Civilization. May be repeated with departmental approval for a total of 9 credit hours if course content varies significantly. Prerequisite(s): HIS 200 and HIS 290.

HIS 335 Medieval Europe Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: An examination of Medieval European history focusing on the medieval origins of modern European institutions. Students will read several historical monographs in order to understand the narrative of medieval history and to gain a greater knowledge about how modern historians write about the medieval past. Prerequisite(s): HIS 200 and HIS 210, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 336 The Crusades Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (even-numbered years).

Course Description: An examination of the origin and history of the wars fought between Christendom and Islam in the Middle Ages. Emphasizes the history of these wars from the perspective of all the cultures involved as well as the influence of the idea of the crusades and crusading on medieval and modern thought. Prerequisite(s): HIS 200 and HIS 210, and a grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 339 Europe 1815-1914 Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (even-numbered years).

Course Description: Europe from the Congress of Vienna to 1914 reaction and revolution, nationalistic movements, rise of socialism-communism, the diplomatic background of World War I. Prerequisite(s): HIS 230 and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 340 Recent European History Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: Europe in World War I, the rise of dictatorships, the League of Nations, new alignments, World War II, and the postwar period. Prerequisite(s): HIS 230 and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 342 The Russian Kingdom and Empire 1462-1917 Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Spring (even-numbered years).

Course Description: Restoration of the Russian kingdom by Ivan III "the Great" establishment of royal absolutism by Ivan IV "the Terrible" the Time of Troubles emergence of the Russian empire invasion by Napoleon expansion of empire collapse of the monarchy. Prerequisite(s): HIS 210 and HIS 230, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 345 Military History Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Fall (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: The historical development and application of military strategy, tactics, doctrine, and technology from ancient times to the present. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140 or HIS 150 or HIS 200 or HIS 210 or HIS 230, and a grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 350 History of East Asia Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: East Asia and the Pacific from antiquity to the present. Topics may include religion, politics, economics, impact of European and American traders and missionaries, interactions with European empires, resistance to Westernization, and the emergence of contemporary China, Japan, and Pacific nations. Prerequisite(s): HIS 210 or HIS 230, and a grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 355 Study Abroad in History Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: An intensive three-week upper-level course in European history. A special fee is assessed for the course. This course is only taught in the summer. Deadline for application is March 1. This course may be taken more than once for credit as an elective, but only once to fulfill a requirement for an upper-level course for the major in either the B.A. or B.S. program in History. Prerequisite(s): HIS 200 or HIS 210 or HIS 230.

HIS 365 Methods of Teaching Social Studies Credits: 5

Typically Offered: Fall (odd-numbered years).

Course Description: Principles and methods of teaching social studies in secondary school: objectives, problems, materials, and methods applied to the social studies curriculum. Methods include electronic portfolio, website technology, and traditional lesson plans/unit plans for each discipline involved. Those disciplines include economics, geography, government and political science, history, psychology, and sociology. Prerequisite(s): Departmental approval. Must be taken prior to Junior Teaching Experience.

HIS 370 History of Latin America Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: A survey course including pre-Columbian cultures, colonial period, independence movements, national developments, relations with the United States and Europe. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140 or HIS 210, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 375 The American Revolution Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Imperial-colonial conflicts declaring independence political, social, economic, religious, and military considerations of war the Confederation period constitutional drafting and ratification. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140, and a grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or department approval.

HIS 380 The French Revolution and Napoleon Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Old Regime France the origins of the French Revolution political, social, religious, and cultural reforms political shifts from monarchy to republic to dictatorship popular and state-sanctioned violence counter-revolution the Terror the Directory the rise of Napoleon the Napoleonic Wars the impact of the French Revolution and Napoleon on the world. Prerequisite(s): HIS 210 and HIS 230, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 383 European Colonialism and Imperialism Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: This course examines the impact that European colonialism and imperialism had on Europe and the world between the sixteenth and twentieth centuries. We will begin with an examination of first contact between Europe and the Americas. We will then examine the evolution of European colonies during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The next stage of the course will examine the decline of the early modern colonial empires in the face of revolutionary movements and the rise of the new imperialism in the nineteenth century. The course will conclude with an examination of the decline of European states as imperial powers in the twentieth century and the legacy and long-term impact of European colonialism and imperialism. Prerequisite(s): HIS 210 and HIS 230 and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or department approval.

HIS 385 U.S. Constitutional History Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: An examination of the social, economic, political, and legal developments related to the United States Constitution emphasis on constitutional foundings, balance of federal and state authorities, protection of individual liberties, and racial and gender equality. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140, HIS 150, and a grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 390 Heresy, Witchcraft, and Magic in Pre-Modern Europe Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Examines the evolution of religious beliefs and practices in pre-modern Europe. Particular attention is given to how definitions of heresy, witchcraft, and magic changed over time and methods used by Church and State to enforce religious conformity. Prerequisite(s): HIS 200 and HIS 210, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 400 Civil War and Reconstruction Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: Westward expansion U.S.-Mexican War sectional crises and coming of the Civil War slavery and abolition political, social, and economic developments in the Civil War African-American freedom political, social, and economic effects of the nation's reconstruction. Prerequisite(s): HIS 140 and HIS 150, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 420 History of Africa Credits: 3

Typically Offered: Departmental Discretion.

Course Description: North Africa in the ancient world Africa during the age of geographical discoveries nineteenth-century European imperialism the emergence of modern African states. Prerequisite(s): 6 credits from among HIS 200, HIS 210, or HIS 230, and grade of C or higher in HIS 290 or departmental approval.

HIS 450 Independent Research/Project Credits: 1-5

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

Course Description: Investigation of a research problem, project, or topic on an individual conference basis. Prerequisite(s): Completion of major-minor declaration in history major or minor, minimum 2.5 GPA in major field, grade of C or higher in HIS 290, and departmental approval.


University Faculty

Benedict Adams (2019) Assistant Professor, Education Department. B.A., Suffield University M.S., Ph.D., Indiana University.

Kaye Adkins (1999) Professor, Communication Department. B.S., Pittsburg State University M.A., Ph.D., University of Kansas.

Perry Adkins (2013) Instructor, Craig School of Business. B.S.B.A., M.B.A., Pittsburg State University C.P.A..

Allison Anderson (2018) Assistant Professor, Nursing Department. B.S.N., M.S.N., Missouri Western State University.

Kevin Anderson (2001) Professor, Computer Science, Mathematics & Physics Department. B.A., Bethany College M.S., Ph.D., Kansas State University.

Dana Andrews (2007) Instructor, Communication Department. B.A., University of Iowa M.F.A., Texas State University.

Jordan Atkinson (2017) Assistant Professor, Communication Department. B.A., Morehead State University M.A., Morehead State University Ph.D., West Virginia University.

Jason Baker (2000) Professor, Biology Department. B.S., Ph.D., Kansas State University.

Julie Baldwin (2004) Associate Professor, Nursing Department. A.S.N., Riverside Community College B.S.N., California State University-Fullerton M.S.N., University of Missouri-Kansas City DNP, Indiana Wesleyan University.

Csengele Barta (2012) Associate Professor, Biology Department. B.S., Babes-Bolyai University M.S., Biological Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences Ph.D., University of Szeged.

Cynthia Bartels (2004) Instructor, Communication Department. B.A., Southwest Missouri State University M.A., University of Arkansas.

Susan Bashinski (2013) Interim Graduate Dean and Professor, Education Department. B.S., M.Ed., University of Missouri-Columbia Ed.D., University of Kansas.

Casey Bell (2019) Instructor, Craig School of Business. B.S.B.A., Missouri Western State University M.B.A., Northwest Missouri State University.

Stacia Bensyl (1991) Professor, Communication Department. B.S.Ed., Northwest Missouri State Uniersity M.A., University College Dublin Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Ollie Bogdon (2018) Assistant Professor, Education Department. B.S., M.S., Cornell University-Ithaca Ph.D., University of Missouri-Kansas City.

Christopher Bond (2009) Associate Professor, Communication Department. B.S., University of Southern Mississippi M.S., Mississippi College Ph.D., University of Memphis.

Jennifer Botello (2018) Assistant Professor, Education Department. B.S., M.S., Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville M.A., Ed.D., Lindenwood University.

Thomas Brecheisen (2018) Assistant Professor, School of Fine Arts. B.A., University of Nevada-Las Vegas M.F.A., Academy of Art University.

Brian Bucklein (2010) Associate Professor, Computer Science, Mathematics & Physics Department. B.S., B.A., East Carolina University Ph.D., Brigham Young University.

Michael Cadden (1996) Professor, Communication Department. B.A., B.A., M.A., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University D.A., Illinois State University.

Cristi Campbell (2004) Associate Professor, Nursing Department. B.S., Missouri Western State College M.S., University of Missouri M.S.N., Vanderbilt University School of Nursing DNP, University of Missouri-Kansas City.

Lauren Campbell (2018) Instructor, Military Science Department.

Mary Carden (2020) Instructor, Nursing Department. B.S.N, Missouri Western State University M.S.N, University of Central Missouri.

James Carviou (2013) Assistant Professor, Communication Department. B.A., M.A., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Ph.D., University of Iowa.

Francisco Castilla Ortiz (2006) Assistant Professor, Communication Department. B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Utah.

Michael Charlton (2008) Professor, Communication Department. B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Oklahoma.

Ronda Chesney (2015) Instructor, Education Department. B.A., Missouri Western State University M.S.Ed., Baker University.

Cary Chevalier (1996) Professor, Biology Department. B.S., M.S., Arizona State University Ph.D., University of California.

Cheng-Huei Chiao (2007) Professor, Craig School of Business. B.S., M.S., National Chung-Hsing University Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Khendum Choden (2020) Assistant Professor, Craig School of Business. B.S., Stony Brook University Ph.D., University of Texas at El Paso.

Hong Choi (2007) Professor, Department of Health Professions. B.A., Yon Sei University M.S., United States Sports Academy Ph.D., Oklahoma State University.

William Chuber (2016) Instructor, Military Science Department. B.S., University of St. Mary.

William Church (2002) Associate Professor, Communication Department. B.A., Missouri Western State College M.A., University of Missouri-Kansas City Ph.D., University of Kansas.

Gary Clapp (2017) Associate Professor, Chemistry Department. B.S./ACS, Mankato State University Ph.D., Oregon State University.

Pamela Clary (2007) Associate Professor, Department of Health Professions. A.A., Highland Community College B.S., Kansas State University M.S.W., University of Kansas Ph.D., Kansas State University.

Tammie Conley (2019) Assistant Professor, Nursing Department. P.N.P., Northland Career Center A.D.N., Park University B.S.N., M.S.N., M.P.H., Ph.D., Univerisyt of Missouri.

Brian Cronk (1993) Chairperson and Professor, Psychology Department. B.S., University of Wisconsin-Madison M.A., Bradley University Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Douglas Davenport (2015) Provost and Professor, Criminal Justice and Legal Studies Department. B.A., Central Bible College M.P.A., Ph.D., Texas Tech University.

Dominic DeBrincat (2015) Associate Professor, Social Sciences and Humanities. B.A., University of Michigan-Dearborn J.D., M.A., Wayne State University Ph.D., University of Connecticut.

Teddi Deka (1997) Professor, Psychology Department. B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University.

Lane DesAutels (2016) Assistant Professor, Social Sciences and Humanities. B.A., University of Puget Sound M.A., Western Michigan University Ph.D., University of Maryland.

Regan Dodd (2012) Chairperson, Associate Professor, Department of Health Professions. B.S., M.S.E., Northwest Missouri State University M.B.A., Baker University Ph.D., University of Kansas.

Dawn Drake (2012) Associate Professor, Biology Department. B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania M.S., University of Delaware Ph.D., University of Tennessee.

Michael Ducey (2001) Chairperson and Professor, Chemistry Department. B.S., University of Kansas Ph.D., University of Michigan.

Todd Eckdahl (1993) Professor, Biology Department. B.S., University of Minnesota-Duluth Ph.D., Purdue University.

Thomas Edwards (2007) Professor, School of Fine Arts. B.M., M.M., Bob Jones University D.M.A., Peabody Conservatory of Music.

Ashley Elias (2019) Assistant Professor, Biology Department. B.S., University of Florida Ph.D., Purdue University.

Grey Endres (2017) Assistant Professor, Department of Health Professions. B.S.E., University of Kansas M.S.W., University of Kansas D.S.W., University of Southern California.

Jonathan Euchner (1993) Assistant Professor, Social Sciences and Humanities. B.A., University of Northern Iowa M.A., University of South Carolina Ph.D., University of Kentucky.

Kelly Fast (2014) Associate Professor, Department of Health Professions. B.S.B.A., Quincy University M.S., College of St. Scholastica.

Phillip Frank (2016) Assistant Professor, Craig School of Business. B.S., Appalachian State University M.B.A., High Point University Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Jana Frye (2014) Associate Professor, Department of Health Professions. B.S., Truman State University M.S.W., University of Kansas.

Nathaniel Gallegos (2020) Instructor, Social Sciences and Humanities. B.S., University of Utah M.S., New Mexico State University J. D., University of Detroit Mercy School of Law LLM, University of Sand Diego School of Law.

Carissa Ganong (2016) Assistant Professor, Biology Department. B.S., Mansfield University M.S., University of Central Arkansas Ph.D., University of Georgia.

Nathan Gay (2014) Associate Professor, School of Fine Arts. B.A., Missouri State University M.M., D.M.A., University of Missouri-Kansas City Conservatory of Music and Dance.

Jacklyn Gentry (2018) Chairperson, Assistant Professor, Nursing Department. B.S.N., Ed.D., University of Arkansas M.S.N., University of Phoenix.

Stephanie Gerlach (2019) Assistant Professor, Department of Health Professions. B.S., Johann-Wolfgang Goethe University Bachelor of Sport and Exercise, Massey University M.S., Minnesota State University Ph.D., University of New Mexico.

Suzanne Godboldt (2012) Associate Professor, Criminal Justice and Legal Studies Department. B.S., Florida Southern College M.A., Sam Houston State University Ph.D., University of Nebraska at Omaha.

Anthony GonzalezInstructor, Military Science Department.

Aaron Grant (2018) Assistant Professor, School of Fine Arts. B.M., M.A., The Pennsylvania State University Ph.D., University of Rochester, Eastman School of Music.

Kara Grant (2019) Assistant Professor, Social Sciences and Humanities. B.S., Linfield College, Ph.D., Washington State University.

Michael Grantham (2016) Assistant Professor, Biology Department. B.S., Emporia State University Ph.D., Louisiana State University.

Mary (Becky) Gregory (2020) Assistant Professor, Nursing Department. B.S.N.,Missouri Western State College M.S.N., Ph.D., University of Missouri-Kansas City.

Konrad Gunderson (2000) Associate Professor, Craig School of Business. B.A., Luther College M.S., University of Wisconsin-Madison Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Angela Haas (2015) Associate Professor, Social Sciences and Humanities. B.A., Ithaca College M.A., Ph.D., Binghamton University.

Lee Harrelson (2005) Professor, School of Fine Arts. B.M., University of Southern Mississippi D.M.A., M.M., University of Missouri-Kansas City.

Crystal Harris (1999) Interim Dean of Science and Health and Associate Professor, Nursing Department. Nursing Diploma, Saint Luke's Hospital School of Nursing B.S.N., William Jewell College M.S.N., University of Kansas Ph.D., University of Missouri-Kansas City.

David Harris (2010) Professor, School of Fine Arts. B.A., Missouri Western State College M.F.A., Fort Hays State University.

Shawna Harris (2009) Chairperson, Associate Professor, Communication Department. B.S., Southern Utah University M.A., University of Nevada Ph.D., University of Georgia.

Teresa Harris (2004) Professor, School of Fine Arts. B.A., Missouri Western State College M.F.A., Fort Hays State University.

Evan Hart (2017) Assistant Professor, Social Sciences and Humanities. B.A., University of Southern Indiana M.A., Ph.D., University of Cincinnati.

Connie Hecker (2000) Assistant Professor, Computer Science, Mathematics & Physics Department. B.S., Missouri Western State College M.S., Regis University.

Kelly Henry (1999) Professor, Psychology Department. B.S., William Jewell College M.A., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Elise Hepworth (2014) Professor, School of Fine Arts. B.S.E., Northwest Missouri State University M.M.E., Kansas City Conservatory of Music, University of Missouri D.A., University of Mississippi.

Matthew Hepworth (2014) Assistant Professor, School of Fine Arts. B.A., Eastern Washington University M.F.A., Savannah College of Art & Design.

Shauna Hiley (1997) Professor, Chemistry Department. B.S., Central Missouri State University Ph.D., University of Wyoming.

Paul Hindemith (2020) Instructor, School of Fine Arts. B.M., Southern Methodist University M.M., University of Maryland-College Park D.M.A., University of Minnesota.

Jeffrey Hinton (1995) Assistant Professor, School of Fine Arts. B.M.E., M.A., Northeast Missouri State University.

Sheila Holder (2019) Intructor, Military Science Department. B.A., Washington University.

Maureen Holtz (2019) Assistant Professor, Department of Health Professions. B.H.S., D.P.T., University of Missouri-Columbia.

Peter Hriso (2008) Professor, School of Fine Arts. B.S., University of Southern Indiana M.F.A., The Ohio State University.

Jennifer Jackson (2017) Assistant Professor, Communication Department. B.A., Otterbein College M.A., University of Cincinnati Ph.D., University of Memphis.

Julie Jedlicka (2015) Associate Professor, Biology Department. B.S., M.S., University of Michigan-Ann Arbor Ph.D., University of California-Santa Cruz.

Cynthia Jeney (2000) Professor, Communication Department. B.S., Northern Arizona University M.A., Ph.D., Arizona State University.

Adrienne Johnson (2013) Chairperson and Associate Professor, Education Department. B.A., University of Denver M.A., National Louis University Ph.D., University of Kansas.

Britton Johnson (2009) Professor, Department of Health Professions. B.S., Albion College M.A., Western Michigan University Ph.D., Walden University.

Logan Jones (2015) Dean and Assistant Professor, Craig School of Business. B.S., M.B.A., Arkansas State University Ph.D., University of Mississippi.

Ali Kamali (1996) Professor, Social Sciences and Humanities. B.A., National University of Iran M.A., University of Detroit Ph.D., Michigan State University.

Heather Kendall (2008) Professor, Nursing Department. B.S.N., Missouri Western State University M.S.N., University of Missouri-Kansas City Ph.D., University of Missouri-Kansas City.

Joseph Kendall-Morwick (2017) Assistant Professor, Computer Science, Mathematics & Physics Department. B.S., Ohio State University M.S, Ph.D., Indiana University.

Joachim Kibirige (1991) Professor, Social Sciences and Humanities. B.A., Makerere University M.S., Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia.

Michael Kimmel (2018) Assistant Professor, Craig School of Business. B.S., St. Louis University M.B.A., Western Carolina University Ph.D., University of Texas at Arlington.

Suzanne Kissock (2005) Chairperson and Associate Professor, Criminal Justice and Legal Studies Department. B.A., St. Louis University J.D., St. Louis University School of Law.

Steven Klassen (1995) Associate Professor, Computer Science, Mathematics & Physics Department. B.S., Friends University M.S., University of Houston-Clear Lake Ph.D., Texas A & M University.

Brooksie Kluge (2014) Advanced Instructor, Communication Department. B.A., M.A., Missouri State University.

Haruka Konishi (2018) Assistant Professor, Education Department. B.A., Temple University Japan Ph.D., University of Delaware.

Melinda Kovacs (2012) Associate Professor, Social Sciences and Humanities. M.A., ELTE, Hungary M.A., Central European University M.A., Ph.D., Rutgers University.

Karen Koy (2008) Associate Professor, Biology Department. B.S., Bowling Green State University M.S., Indiana University Ph.D., University of Illinois at Chicago.

Justin Kraft (2007) Professor, Department of Health Professions. B.S., Jamestown College M.A., University of Northern Colorado Ph.D., University of Alabama.

Kenneth Kriewitz (2002) Advanced Instructor, Department of Health Professions. B.S., M.S., Central Missouri State University.

Marianne Kunkel (2014) Associate Professor, Communication Department. B.A., Auburn University M.F.A., University of Florida Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Yipkei Kwok (2015) Assistant Professor, Computer Science, Mathematics & Physics Department. B.S., Hong Kong Baptist University M.S., California State University Ph.D., The University of Texas at El Paso.

Kamal Lamsal (2019) Assistant Professor, Craig School of Business. B.A., Coe College MACC, Emporia State University Ph.D., University of Iowa.

Toby Lawrence (2017) Assistant Professor, School of Fine Arts. B.A., University of Missouri-Kansas City M.F.A., California Institute of the Arts.

Stanley Jay Lemanski (2012) Associate Professor, Social Sciences and Humanities. B.A., Concordia College M.A., University of Michigan M.Div., Concordia Seminary M.A, Ph.D., University of Akron.

Gregory Lindsteadt (2005) Professor, Criminal Justice and Legal Studies Department. B.S., University of Nebraska M.S., Central Missouri State University Ph.D., Indiana University.

Bob Long (2004) Assistant Professor, School of Fine Arts. B.M.E., M.A., Truman State University D.M.A., University of Missouri-Kansas City.

Steven Lorimor (1999) Associate Professor, Chemistry Department. B.S., Central Missouri State University Ph.D., University of Wyoming.

Brett Luthans (1996) Professor, Craig School of Business. B.S., M.A., Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Jon Mandracchia (2015) Associate Professor, Psychology Department. B.A., Truman State University M.A., Ph.D., Texas Tech University.

David Marble (2013) Associate Professor, Criminal Justice and Legal Studies Department. B.A., Brigham Young University M.P.A., University of Utah M.S., Ph.D., University of Texas at Dallas.

Susan Martens (2013) Associate Professor, Communication Department. B.A.E., Wayne State College M.A., University of South Dakota Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

David Kratz Mathies (2009) Professor, Social Sciences and Humanities. B.A., Goshen College MATS, Anabaptist Mennonite Biblical Seminary Ph.D., Boston University.

Nathanael May (2009) Chairperson and Professor, School of Fine Arts. B.M., University of Wisconsin-Whitewater M.M. University of Rochester D.M.A., University of Kansas.

Lori McCune (2012) Associate Professor, Computer Science, Mathematics & Physics Department. B.S., University of Akron M.S., Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

David McIntire (2013) Associate Professor, School of Fine Arts. B.S., Nazareth College of Rochester M.M., Ithaca College, M.M., D.M.A., University of Missouri-Kansas City.

Cheryl McIntosh (2018) Assistant Professor, Craig School of Business. B.A., Brigham Young University-Hawai'I M.B.A., University of Texas at Dallas Ph.D., University of Texas at Arlington.

Mechel McKinney (2019) Assistant Professor, Department of Health Professions. A.A.S, University of New Mexico. B.B.A. University of Phoenix. M.B.A., American Public University.

Erin McLaughlin (2018) Assistant Professor, Craig School of Business. B.S., M.B.A., Missouri State University Ph.D., University of North Texas.

David McMahan (2001) Professor, Communication Department. A.S., Vincennes University B.S., M.A., Indiana State University Ph.D., University of Iowa.

David McWilliams (1996) Instructor, Computer Science, Mathematics & Physics Department. B.S., M.A., Southwest Missouri State University.

Dennis Merritt (2019) Instructor, Engineering Technology. A.A.S., Missouri Western State University B.A., MidAmerica Nazarene University M.S., University of Central Missouri Ph.D., State Louis University.

Natalie Mikita (2016) Assistant Professor, Chemistry Department. B.S., Otterbein College, Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University.

Amy Miller (2015) Advanced Instuctor, Communication Department. B.S., B.S.E., Missouri Western State University M.S.Ed., University of Missouri.

Mark Mills (2008) Chairperson, Professor, Biology Department. B.S., M.A., University of Nebraska at Omaha Ph.D., University of Georgia.

Wes Moore (2017) Assistant Professor, Engineering Technology. B.S.Ed., B.S.C., M.U., M.S., University of Missouri-Columbia.

Jones Mutua (2018) Assistant Professor, Computer Science, Mathematics & Physics Department. B.S., University of Eastern Africa, Baraton M.S., Ph.D., University of Missouri-Kansas City.

Murray Nabors (2008) Professor, Biology Department. B.S., Yale College Ph.D., Michigan State University.

Shiva Nandan (2017) Assistant Professor, Craig School of Business. B.Sc., M.Sc., Gorakhpur University M.B.A., University of British Columbia Ph.D., University of Texas at Arlington CFA, Chartered Financial Analyst.

Aracely Newton (2019) Assistant Professor, Biology Department. B.S., University of Missouri-Kansas City Ph.D., University of Kansas.

Laura Nold (2014) Instructor, Nursing Department. B.S.N., M.S.N., Missouri Western State University.

J. Evan Noynaert (1985) Chairperson, Assistant Professor, Computer Science, Mathematics & Physics Department. B.A, University of Illinois M.S. University of Iowa M.S., Midwestern State University.

Robert Nulph (2013) Professor, Communication Department. B.S.E., M.S., Clarion University of Pennsylvania Ph.D., University of Kansas.

James Okapal (2005) Professor, Social Sciences and Humanities. B.S., The Ohio State University M.A., Bowling Green State University Ph.D., University of Tennessee.

Herschel Pickett (1980) Assistant Professor, Computer Science, Mathematics & Physics Department. B.S., M.S., University of Missouri-Rolla.

Jeffrey Poet (2002) Professor, Computer Science, Mathematics & Physics Department. B.A., Ottawa University M.S., Kansas State University Ph.D., University of Wyoming.

Elizabeth Potts (2016) Associate Professor, Education Department. B.S., M.S., Longwood College, Ph.D., University of Virginia-Charlottesville.

Long Qiao (2009) Associate Professor, Engineering Technology. B.S., Xian University of Architecture & Technology M.S., Texas Tech University Ph.D., Kansas State University.

Bin Qiu (2017) Assistant Professor, Craig School of Business. B.S., Northwestern Polytechnical University M.S., University of International Business and Economics M.B.A., Babson College.

Gretchen Quenstedt-Moe (2009) Associate Professor, Nursing Department. B.S.N., M.S.N., Ph.D., University of Kansas.

Maureen Raffensperger (1997) Professor, Department of Health Professions. B.S., University of Nebraska Medical Center M.S., University of Missouri-Columbia DPT, Des Moines University.

Jonathan Rhoad (2006) Professor, Chemistry Department. A.B., William Jewell College M.S., Ph.D., The Ohio State University.

Glenn Rice (2006) Associate Professor, Computer Science, Mathematics & Physics Department. B.A., Tabor College M.A., Ph.D., University of Kansas.

Stacey Rieck (2017) Assistant Professor, Psychology Department. B.A., Northern Kentucky University M.A., University of Dayton Ph.D., Texas A&M University.

Madeline Rislow (2015) Assistant Professor, School of Fine Arts. B.A., Gustavus Adolphus College M.A., Ph.D., University of Kansas.

Miguel Rivera-Taupier (2013) Associate Professor, Communication Department. B.A., Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú M.A., Tulane University Ph.D., University of Virginia.

Ian Roberts (1996) Professor, Communication Department. B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Karman Romero (2017) Assistant Professor, Department of Health Professions. B.S.N., University of Utah Ph.D., University of Kansas.

Tilottama Roy (2017) Assistant Professor, Biology Department. B.S., Presidency College M.S., University of Calcutta M.S., University of South Dakota Ph.D, The State University of New York at Buffalo.

William Russell (2005) Professor, Department of Health Professions. B.A., Cleveland State University M.S., Ball State University Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia.

Linda Salfrank (2020) Instructor, Craig School of Business. B.A., J.D., University of Missouri-Columbia.

Cassandra Samuel (2015) Instructor, Craig School of Business. B.S., M.S., Northwest Missouri State University.

Fiona Sansone (2016) Director for Center of Excellence in Applied Healthcare Learning & Assistant Professor, Nursing Department and Department of Health Professions. B.S.N., Missouri Western State University M.S.W., University of Missouri.

Daniel Shepherd (2014) Associate Professor, Education Department. B.A., Cedarville University M.Ed., Indiana Wesleyan University Ed.S., Ed.D., Ball State University).

Kay Siebler (2008) Professor, Communication Department. B.A., M.A., University of Nebraska-Lincoln Ph.D., Miami University.

Brandon Siegfried (2020) Instructor, Military Science Department.


Contents

Year Conference Coach Overall record Conference record
2003 † Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association Jerry Partridge 9–3 7–2
2012 12–2 9–1
Total conference championships: 2
† Denotes co-champions

Official record (including any NCAA imposed vacates and forfeits) against all current MIAA opponents as of the end of the 2015 season:

The Griffons have played their home games at Spratt Stadium since 1979. The current capacity of the stadium is at 7,200. [6]


Missouri Southern State University was founded in 1937 as Joplin Junior College. [2] At its conception, Joplin Junior College had 114 students and only 9 faculty members. In 1964, residents of Jasper County, Missouri approved a $2.5 million bond issue to begin construction on a new campus, where the university is currently located. The new campus opened in the fall of 1967 with 2,399 students and 95 faculty members. In 1977, the school was renamed Missouri Southern State College and officially became a state-assisted four-year college and part of the state of Missouri's higher education system. In 2003, the Missouri General Assembly authorized the renaming of the college to Missouri Southern State University - Joplin in 2005 the university dropped Joplin from its name.

In 1967, the campus was home to six buildings. The Taylor Performing Arts center was completed in 1973 and the Richard M. Webster Communications and Social Science Building opened in August 1992.

Missouri Southern recently finished construction on a health sciences building. The building, which had its groundbreaking on May 19, 2008, was built with money secured by MOHELA and distributed to MSSU by the state of Missouri. The Missouri General Assembly had entertained the addition of the Joplin Regional Center, owned by the Missouri Department of Mental Health, to Missouri Southern's campus in spring of 2009. [3]

The school is about 30 blocks northeast of the worst of the devastation of the 2011 Joplin tornado which destroyed much of southern Joplin on May 22, 2011—one day after the school's graduation. Joplin High School had just completed its school graduation on the campus shortly before the tornado. The Leggett and Platt Athletic Center was used as an emergency shelter for victims. Billingsly Student Center was the headquarters for volunteer efforts run by Americorps St. Louis and was the coordination area for identifying victims and survivors. On May 29, 2011, Barack Obama, who was inspecting the damage, spoke at the Taylor Performing Arts Center. [4] [5]

Presidents Edit

Missouri Southern has had seven presidents that have served since its beginning in 1967. [6]

Title Name Dates
President Leon C. Billingsly 1967–1978
President Dr. Donald C. Darnton 1979–1982
President Dr. Julio León 1982–2007
Interim President Dr. Teri Agee 2007–2008
President Dr. Bruce Speck 2008–2013
President Dr. Alan Marble 2013–2020
President Dr. Dean Van Galen 2020–present

The campus of Missouri Southern is cross divided by Duquesne Road (running north–south) and Newman Road (running east–west). The main portion of the campus is located west of Duquesne, though the football stadium and softball fields are on the east side of Duquesne.

Academic buildings Edit

Spiva Library (opened in 1967) was the first building built on the current campus following the properties purchase for use by what was then Missouri Southern College. The library is named after prominent Joplin businessman George A. Spiva (1904–1967), [7] who was a major donor and supporter of the school. Expansions to the library in 1972–1973 and 1999–2000 have tripled the size of the original structure. Prior to 1987, the social sciences department utilized some areas of the building for classrooms and offices. [8]

Reynolds Hall (opened in 1967) is named after one of the original members of the school's board of regents, Lauren R. Reynolds (1916–1968). He served on the board from 1965 until his death. [9] This building houses the biology and environmental health, chemical and physical sciences, and mathematics departments. On Dec. 5, 2014, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon announced that he would request more than $5.2 million in funding from the state legislature for renovations to the building. The funds will allow MSSU to renovate labs, classrooms and electrical systems. [10] [11]

Hearnes Hall (opened in 1967) is named after former Missouri Governor Warren E. Hearnes (1923–2009) who was governor at the time of the construction of the campus and signed the law which made Missouri Southern a state institution. Hearnes Hall is the university's administration building, but was previously home to English department (now located in Kuhn Hall) and the communications department (now located in Webster Hall). Hearnes Hall has never been expanded, but underwent major renovations ending in 2012.

Fine Arts Building (opened in 1967) is the home to the music and art departments. It is also home of the Spiva Gallery and is connected to both the Taylor Performing Arts Center and the Bud Walton Black Box Theatre.

Leon C. Billingsly Student Center (opened in 1969) is named after the first president of what was then Missouri Southern College, Leon C. Billingsly (1925–1978). Billingsly served in that capacity from 1964 until his death and supervised the construction of the original buildings on the campus. [12] The building is home to the cafeteria, book store and Keystone and Connor ballrooms. Formerly known as the College Union, it was renamed for Billingsly in 1980, two years after his death. It has been expanded multiple times, the latest in 2009 when the George S. Beimdiek Recreation Center and Willcoxon Student Health Center were added onto it. [6]

Kuhn Hall (opened in 1969) is named after Dr. John Raymond Kuhn (1902–1986) a Joplin area doctor who encouraged more practical application medical training at the college. It was originally home to the nursing (now in the Health Sciences Building) and computer science departments (now in Plaster Hall). Today it is home to the English department. [ citation needed ] The neighboring Kuhn Annex, which was built in 1963 and also houses part of the English department, was originally a model home for a proposed housing subdivision planned by Rolla Stephens on the former Mission Hills estate. When Stephens learned of the search for a new campus for the college, he worked with George A. Spiva and Morgan Hillhouse so the land could instead be used for that purpose. [12]

Ummel Technology Center (opened in 1971) is named for Elvin Byron Ummel (1922–1993), who served on the school's board of trustees from the 1964 to 1986, when that body was abolished. The center now houses some of the programs falling under the biology and environmental health department in the School of Arts and Sciences, including the cadaver lab. [13] It underwent a major renovation in 2011 and 2012 and had previously been used for technology and engineering courses, including automotive technology and drafting.

Thomas E. Taylor Performing Arts Center (opened in 1974) is named for former Missouri Southern board of regents member (1965–1974) and board of trustees member (1964–1975) Thomas E. Taylor (1902–1975). The 2,000-seat performing arts center was built on a $1 million bond and is home to the theatre department.

Taylor Hall (opened in 1977) also known as the Gene Taylor Education Center is named for U.S. Congressman Gene Taylor (1928–1998). Taylor had served on the board of trustees from 1964 to 1972 and was the president of that board at the time the current campus opened in 1967. [12] Taylor Hall has been home to the school of education and psychology since its construction, though it has been enlarged since that time.

Mills Anderson Justice Center (opened in 1978) is named for former Missouri Southern board of regents (1965–1977) member Mills Anderson (1914–1999). It is home of the college's criminal justice department and law enforcement academy. It was greatly expanded in 1996. [12]

Plaster Hall (opened in 1980) is also known as the Robert W. Plaster Free Enterprise Center and is named for Robert W. Plaster (1930–2008), a former Joplin Junior College student and the founder of Empire Gas. [14] Formerly known as Matthews Hall and named after Norval M. Matthews (1895–1977), an original member of the school's board of regents from 1965 until his death, the building and the school of business, which has resided in it since its construction, were renamed after Plaster in 2006 when he made the largest donation in the college's history. Prior to this building's construction, the school of business had been located in the former Mission Hills mansion, today the Ralph L. Gray Alumni Center, from 1969 to 1980. [15]

Webster Hall (opened in 1992) is named for Richard M. Webster (1922–1990), a former speaker of the Missouri House of Representatives and a longtime state senator representing the area from 1962 until his death. The building cost $7.5 million at the time of its construction and is home to the social sciences, communications, foreign languages, and international studies departments. The W. Robert Corley Auditorium is located inside Webster Hall. It was named after William Robert Corley, a local businessman following a significant donation by him in 2009.

Bud Walton Black Box Theatre (opened in 1999) is named for Bud Walton, brother of Walmart founder Sam Walton and a financial donor for the construction of the facility. The Walton Black Box Theatre was built as a replacement for the college's previous Barn Theatre, which was destroyed by fire in 1990. [16]

Julio S. Leon Health Sciences Center (opened in 2010) is named for Dr. Julio Leon, who served as the president of the University from 1982 to 2007. It houses programs in nursing, dental hygiene, kinesiology, medical technology, psychology, radiologic technology and respiratory therapy.

Jeremiah "Jay" Nixon Hall (opened in 2019) is named for the 55th governor of Missouri Jeremiah "Jay" Nixon, who served from 2009 to 2017. Governor Nixon campaigned and received $5.2 million that was used to construct the hall and renovate the nearby Reynolds hall. Nixon hall is used for mathematics and other STEM fields. The building is three stories and houses staff offices, study rooms, and many classrooms. It is connected to Reynolds hall via a sky bridge on the second floor and is the newest building on campus.

Alumni Center Edit

The Ralph L. Gray Alumni Center (opened in 2011) is named after Ralph L. Gray, a major donor for the building's restoration. The building, also known as the Mission Hills mansion, is the oldest structure on campus, built in 1926 as the private home of Lucius Buchanan. When the property was purchased for use as the university's campus in 1964, the mansion was originally used by then President Leon Billingsly for his office space. It then served as the home of the school of business from 1969 to 1980 and the social sciences department between 1987 and 1992. It sat empty from 1992 until 2006, when the process of restoring and renovating it for its current use started. [15]

Former buildings Edit

Joplin Junior College at 4th Street & Byers Avenue (1938–1959) was the first permanent home of the college (the year previously the college's courses were taught in the Joplin High School building at 8th Street and Wall Avenue). The building, which was originally constructed in 1897 and then nearly doubled in size in 1907, had previously served as the home of Joplin High School and later as North Junior High School before being renovated for use by the fledgling college. Joplin Junior College moved out of the building in 1959, moving to the now unused former home of Joplin High School at 8th Street and Wall Avenue. The 4th Street & Byers Avenue building was razed in 1961.

Blaine Hall (1946–1959) was named after Harry E. Blaine, the dean of Joplin Junior College from 1937 to 1947. It is not to be confused with the dormitory on the current campus that is also named after Blaine. It was located in a formerly private residence that was near Joplin Junior College's first home at the corner of 4th Street and Byers Avenue. Blaine Hall acted as a student union and had a cafeteria and a student lounge. The building was abandoned by the college when it moved to its second home at 8th Street and Wall Avenue in 1959. It was eventually torn down.

Joplin Junior College/Jasper County Community College at 8th Street and Wall Avenue (1959–1967) was the second permanent home of what was then Joplin Junior College (though the first year the college had offered courses in 1937 those classes had also taken place in this building). During the time the college was in this building it was renamed Jasper County Community College. This structure was built in 1917 as the home of Joplin High School, replacing the previous building at 4th Street & Byers Avenue, which was also home to Joplin Junior College from 1938 to 1959. The college was in this building from 1959 until 1967, when it moved to its current campus. The building became Memorial High School from 1968 to 1985 and then Memorial Middle School. The nearly 100-year-old structure still stands and now serves as the Joplin public school district's Memorial Education Center.

The Barn Theatre (1967–1990) was the first performing arts space on the current university campus. It had originally served as a dairy barn for the Mission Hills farm. With a limited budget and no theatre space included among the original academic buildings planned for the campus, theatre department staff transformed the former dairy barn into the campus's first theatre. It remained popular and in use even after the construction of the much larger and modern Thomas E. Taylor Center for Performing Arts in 1973. The Barn Theatre was destroyed by a fire on Thanksgiving Day in 1990. [16]

The Learning Center (1967–2005) was renovated out of the shell of the former garage of the Mission Hills mansion. The original space had been expanded and at previous times housed the school of business and the department of social sciences. In 1992 it was remodeled for use for student tutoring and other similar needs. It was demolished in 2005 to make way for the construction of the George S. Beimdiek Recreation Center and Willcoxon Student Health Center and for the renovation of the Mission Hills mansion into the Ralph L. Gray Alumni Center, which takes up some of the footprint previously occupied by the Learning Center.

The Guest House (1967–2005) had served as a guest house for the Mission Hills mansion when it was a private residence. But following the establishment of the university on its current campus, the school's newspaper, The Chart, had its offices in this building, though they were later moved to Hearnes Hall and are currently located inside Webster Hall. The building served various other purposes as office space and eventually storage for the university before being razed in 2005.

Residential life Edit

The campus has two traditional dormitories, eight apartment-style housing complexes, and two suite-style dormitories. The dormitories are McCormick and Blaine Halls the apartments are Gockel, Stegge, Dishman, Dryer, Stone, Headlee, Maupin, and Mitchell Halls and the suite-style dorms are located in East Hall and The Quads. Also a part of the residence area of campus is the Mayes Student Life Center, which is home to the university's cafeteria, weight room, residence computer labs, and commons area. These dorms house about 600 students. The Quads, opened fall of 2015, is a three-story complex that features 51 student apartments the vast majority of which will be four bedrooms.

Residence halls Edit

Blaine Hall (opened in 1971) is named after Harry E. Blaine (1873–1955), who served as the first dean of what was then Joplin Junior College from its opening in 1937 until his retirement in 1947. This facility is all male and is arranged as a traditional style dormitory, housing 174 students, mostly freshmen. [17]

McCormick Hall (opened in 1971) is named after Martha McCormick (1902–1987), who taught mathematics from 1939 to 1973 at what was first Joplin Junior College and then later Missouri Southern State College. This facility houses 90 students and was one of the first two dormitories built on the campus, housing only female students since it opened. [17]

Dishman Hall (opened in 1980) is named after Darral Dishman (1936–1984), who started as an art professor at what was then Joplin Junior College in 1964. He later became head of the department and remained at the college until his death. Dishman Hall is a dormitory that is set up as suite style apartments and houses 32 students. [17]

Dryer Hall (opened in 1980) is named after Dr. Lloyd L. Dryer (1911–1984), who was a professor of psychology at what was first Joplin Junior College and then Missouri Southern State College. Dryer Hall is a dormitory that is set up as suite style apartments and houses 32 students. [17]

Gockel Hall (opened in 1980) is named after Harry Gockel (1902–1984), who started at what was then Joplin Junior College in 1939, just two years after its founding, and retired from the college in 1972. He was a professor of history, economics and geography. A bequest in his and his late wife's, Berniece Gockel (1911–1995), will provided the seed money for the university's annual Harry and Berniece Gockel International Symposium. Gockel Hall is a dormitory that is set up as suite style apartments and houses 32 students. [17]

Headlee Hall (opened in 1980) is named after Cleetus Juanita Headlee (1911–2000), who from 1946 to 1976 was an English professor at what was then Joplin Junior College and later Missouri Southern State College. Between 1948 and 1967 she was the advisor for the college newspaper, The Chart. Headlee Hall is a dormitory that is set up as suite style apartments and houses 32 students. [17]

Stegge Hall (opened in 1980) is named after Dudley Frank Stegge (1923–1992), who started at what was then Joplin Junior College in 1951 as a track and football coach. Stegge later served as dean of students from 1967 to 1969 and was the director of the Student Union, now Billingsly Student Center, from 1969 until his retirement in 1980. Stegge Hall is a dormitory that is set up as suite style apartments and houses 32 students. [17]

Maupin Hall (opened in 1987) is named after Dr. Jim Maupin (1923–2006), who served as dean of technology at what was then Missouri Southern State College, retiring in 1992. He started his career with the college in 1954 teaching biology. Maupin Hall is a dormitory that is set up as suite style apartments and houses 32 students. [17]

Mitchell Hall (opened in 1987) is named after Grace Clayton Mitchell (1920–2006), a longtime English professor at what was first Joplin Junior College and later Missouri Southern State College. She first taught at the school in 1946 and after taking a break from teaching returned in 1958 and remained until retiring in 1981. Mitchell Hall is a dormitory that is set up as suite style apartments and houses 32 students. [17]

Stone Hall (opened in 1991) is named after Dorothy Aleta Stone (1909–2001), who was a professor of business administration at what was first Joplin Junior College and then Missouri Southern State College from 1939 to 1975. Stone Hall is a dormitory that is set up as suite style apartments and houses 32 students. [17]

Mayes Student Life Center (opened in 1993) is named for Dianne S. Mayes (1936–1995), a longtime supporter of the university. The facility includes a computer lab, laundry facilities, vending machines, aerobic workout room, weight room and a large-screen television lounge for all students, faculty and staff. [6] A major addition, including a cafeteria, was added in 1999. [17]

East Hall (opened in 2002) is the largest of the university's residential buildings. It houses 202 students in suite style dormitories. [17] East hall is named because it is the easternmost residential building on campus.

The Quads (opened in 2015) is the newest of the university's dormitories. The name "Quads" come from the 4 bedroom style in which each "room" is built. There is a living area, kitchen, 4 bedrooms, each with their own bathroom, and a laundry room in each "Quad." The Quads house 200 students.

Greek life Edit

Currently, MSSU is home to three fraternities, two sororities and many honorary and professional societies. MSSU has the Pi-Eta chapter of the Kappa Sigma fraternity, and the Delta Pi chapter of the Kappa Alpha Order fraternity. Phi Delta Theta began operating on campus in 2020. Missouri Southern has the Zeta Alpha chapter of the Alpha Sigma Alpha sorority and the Eta Upsilon chapter of the Zeta Tau Alpha sorority. Missouri Southern does not have any brick-and-mortar or traditional greek housing.

Student organizations, groups and activities Edit

There are over 70 student organizations. These organizations range from ethnic to political, religious to special interest.

MSSU Student Senate (SS) is the official voice of the student body at Missouri Southern State University. SS strives to find solutions to campus issues by making policy recommendations to the administration. SS is a forum for problems, concerns, questions, suggestions, and ideas as they relate to student life on campus. SS serves as the governing body for all students and more than 70 student organizations on campus. SS was established in MSSU's early years and has been active on campus ever since. SS is entirely funded by student fees, receiving a budget of $20,000 each academic year. Meetings are held once a week on Wednesdays and are open to the public.

The Campus Activities Board (CAB) orchestrates activities and programs in the Billingsly Student Union and around campus. CAB is a student-run programming board dedicated to enhancing the college experience at Missouri Southern. By effectively utilizing the Student Involvement Fee, CAB aims to provide educational, entertaining, cultural, and leisure opportunities to complement the students' academic experience.

Intramural sports are also available on campus. The University also supports students competing in collegiate mock trial as governed by the American Mock Trial Association.

Missouri Southern currently has many student organizations including Student Senate, Campus Activities Board, 34 Departmental organizations, 12 honors organizations, 9 religious organizations, and 19 special interest organizations. The university also has a school newspaper, The Chart, and an alumni magazine, Crossroads. [18]

Intramurals Edit

Missouri Southern has a sophisticated intramural sports program. Sports included are flag football, softball, whiffleball, volleyball, 5-on-5 basketball, 3-on-3 basketball, mini-golf, soccer, hold-'em poker, bowling, table tennis, dodgeball and billiards.


Civics Requirement

In accordance with section 170.013 RSMo, any student pursuing an associate’s or bachelor’s degree “shall successfully pass an examination on the provisions and principles of American civics with a score of seventy percent or greater as a condition of graduation from such institution. The examination shall be known as the “Missouri Higher Education Civics Achievement Examination”.

How has Missouri Western included the civics requirement into the associate and baccalaureate degrees?

A degree requirement has been added to the list of general requirements for associate and baccalaureate degrees.

Who is required to take the Missouri Higher Education Civics Achievement Examination?

Beginning in Fall 2019, all students who officially declare a major (by signing a major declaration form with their advisor) must meet this degree requirement.

How can the civics degree requirement be met at Missouri Western?

Missouri Western will automatically enroll all degree-seeking students who need the exam in the Missouri Higher Education Civics Achievement Examination course in Canvas (free of charge) during their first semester. This course will remain in the student’s Canvas course list until the end of the semester in which the student successfully completes the exam.

Do transfer students need to meet the civics requirement?

A student who transfers to Missouri Western and has taken and passed the Missouri Higher Education Civics Achievement Examination at another Missouri school will be considered to have met this requirement. A comment or note indicating such completion must be included on the transfer school’s official transcript which is sent to Missouri Western. Otherwise, transfer students will need to pass the exam at Missouri Western to meet the degree requirement.

Is this the same as the Missouri Constitution degree requirement?


Featured Schools

College Factual provides higher-education, college and university, degree, program, career, salary, and other helpful information to students, faculty, institutions, and other internet audiences. Presented information and data are subject to change. Inclusion on this website does not imply or represent a direct relationship with the company, school, or brand. Information, though believed correct at time of publication, may not be correct, and no warranty is provided. Contact the schools to verify any information before relying on it. Financial aid may be available for those who qualify. The displayed options may include sponsored or recommended results, not necessarily based on your preferences.


Talk:Missouri Western State University

There are multiple issues with this article, the only explanation is that it has been pranked. I am not a student there and do not have the time to correct the intentional errors. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.62.201.176 (talk) 21:45, 1 February 2012 (UTC)

I have just added archive links to one external link on Missouri Western State University. Please take a moment to review my edit. If necessary, add <> after the link to keep me from modifying it. Alternatively, you can add <> to keep me off the page altogether. I made the following changes:

When you have finished reviewing my changes, please set the checked parameter below to true to let others know.

As of February 2018, "External links modified" talk page sections are no longer generated or monitored by InternetArchiveBot . No special action is required regarding these talk page notices, other than regular verification using the archive tool instructions below. Editors have permission to delete these "External links modified" talk page sections if they want to de-clutter talk pages, but see the RfC before doing mass systematic removals. This message is updated dynamically through the template <> (last update: 15 July 2018).

  • If you have discovered URLs which were erroneously considered dead by the bot, you can report them with this tool.
  • If you found an error with any archives or the URLs themselves, you can fix them with this tool.

Conflict of Interest: I am an employee of Missouri Western State University. Please see below information from u/KentHeier that includes information that needs to be updated, especially enrollment numbers. Thank you, BWShields (talk) 20:05, 25 May 2017 (UTC)BWShields

Conflict of Interest: I am employed by Missouri Western State University

(The enrollment numbers are out of date, and the linked source does not include enrollment information. Fall 2016 numbers are available at https://www.missouriwestern.edu/news/2016/10/03/mwsu-enrollment-at-5388-with-record-graduate-school-numbers/, but the source included below is the most current authoritative external source.) | students = 5,513 (Fall 2015) [1] | undergrad = 5,296 (Fall 2015) [1] | postgrad = 217 (Fall 2015) [1]

Missouri Western State University is a public, co-educational university located in Saint Joseph, Missouri, United States. The school enrolls 5,513 undergraduate students and 217 graduate students.

Under History: Legislation in 2005 [2] changed the institution's name to Missouri Western State University. That legislation designated Missouri Western as Missouri's Applied Learning Institution and allowed it to grant master's degrees. The university hooded its first 12 master's degree recipients in May 2009. [3] As of 2016, Western offers 18 master's degrees and six graduate certificates. [4]

(updated enrollment numbers to match infobox, updated dead links, number of graduate programs)

Additional changes requested to notable alumni, June 6, 2017. Jerry Partridge is no longer Missouri Western's head coach Paul Rhoads is no longer ISU's coach

    , Delta State University football defensive coordinator , University of Arkansas football defensive coordinator , Missouri Western State University head football coach

KentHeier (talk) 16:03, 19 December 2016 (UTC)

I went ahead and updated the article according to the requests and used the 2016 enrollment totals from the school itself (no reason to believe they are inaccurate). For the alumni, I used more general terms ("head coach in college football" and "professional football player in the NFL") so they don't have to be updated every time the person changes teams. --JonRidinger (talk) 15:12, 6 June 2017 (UTC)

I have just modified 2 external links on Missouri Western State University. Please take a moment to review my edit. If you have any questions, or need the bot to ignore the links, or the page altogether, please visit this simple FaQ for additional information. I made the following changes:

When you have finished reviewing my changes, you may follow the instructions on the template below to fix any issues with the URLs.

As of February 2018, "External links modified" talk page sections are no longer generated or monitored by InternetArchiveBot . No special action is required regarding these talk page notices, other than regular verification using the archive tool instructions below. Editors have permission to delete these "External links modified" talk page sections if they want to de-clutter talk pages, but see the RfC before doing mass systematic removals. This message is updated dynamically through the template <> (last update: 15 July 2018).

  • If you have discovered URLs which were erroneously considered dead by the bot, you can report them with this tool.
  • If you found an error with any archives or the URLs themselves, you can fix them with this tool.

Conflict of interest: I am a Missouri Western employee.

Campus buildings: Under "Spratt Hall" consider linking the Walter Cronkite Memorial to the section about the Memorial on the main Walter Cronkite page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Cronkite#Memorial_at_Missouri_Western_State_University

A separate section on this page for the Memorial might also be merited.

The addition of men's and women's cross country, indoor track and field, and outdoor track and field will bring the total number of sports to 16.

Thank you. KentHeier (talk) 14:50, 27 June 2017 (UTC)

@KentHeier: Done – all but a section for the memorial has been added to the page. Corkythe hornetfan (ping me) 22:33, 27 June 2017 (UTC)

I have just modified 3 external links on Missouri Western State University. Please take a moment to review my edit. If you have any questions, or need the bot to ignore the links, or the page altogether, please visit this simple FaQ for additional information. I made the following changes:

  • Added archive https://web.archive.org/web/20091120093323/http://www.stjoenews.net/news/2009/aug/18/hearnes-instrumental-westerns-birth/ to http://www.stjoenews.net/news/2009/aug/18/hearnes-instrumental-westerns-birth/
  • Added archive https://web.archive.org/web/20110714175056/http://www.newspressnow.com/your-letters/25901215/detail.html to http://www.newspressnow.com/your-letters/25901215/detail.html
  • Added archive https://web.archive.org/web/20090511223511/http://www.stjoenews.net/news/2009/may/10/inaugural-masters-students-earn-degrees-western/ to http://www.stjoenews.net/news/2009/may/10/inaugural-masters-students-earn-degrees-western/
  • Added <> tag to http://www.aacsb.edu/media/releases/2010/accreditation-mwestern.asp

When you have finished reviewing my changes, you may follow the instructions on the template below to fix any issues with the URLs.

As of February 2018, "External links modified" talk page sections are no longer generated or monitored by InternetArchiveBot . No special action is required regarding these talk page notices, other than regular verification using the archive tool instructions below. Editors have permission to delete these "External links modified" talk page sections if they want to de-clutter talk pages, but see the RfC before doing mass systematic removals. This message is updated dynamically through the template <> (last update: 15 July 2018).


The Missouri Valley Football Conference has a complex history that involves three other conferences:

    (MVC): A long-established conference, in existence since 1907, that sponsored football until 1985. In its last years as a football conference, it was a hybrid league that included teams in NCAA Divisions I-A (today's FBS) and I-AA (now FCS). (Gateway): A women's sports conference founded in 1982 by MVC member schools. [1][2] (AMCU): An all-sports conference, also founded in 1982, that sponsored football at the I-AA level through the 1984 season. The AMCU had absorbed the Mid-Continent Athletic Association, a football-only league founded in 1978. (After dropping football, the AMCU later became the Mid-Continent Conference, and is now The Summit League.)

In 1985, the MVC stopped sponsoring football. At that time, the two remaining I-AA members from the MVC (Illinois State and Southern Illinois) joined Eastern Illinois, Northern Iowa, Southwest Missouri State, and Western Illinois from the AMCU and together became a football conference under the Gateway's auspices. [3] Indiana State, which had left MVC football after the 1981 season to become a Division I-AA independent while remaining a full MVC member, would join the next year. [4]

In 1992, when the Gateway Collegiate Athletic Conference merged with the MVC, [1] the football conference kept the Gateway charter, with a minor name change to Gateway Football Conference. After Eastern Illinois joined the Ohio Valley Conference for football in 1995, Youngstown State joined in 1997 and was followed by Western Kentucky University in 2001. Southwest Missouri State changed its name to Missouri State in 2005.

Western Kentucky moved to the Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS formerly Division I-A) after the 2006 season. [5] Left with seven members for the 2007 season, Great West Football Conference members North Dakota State and South Dakota State [6] were invited to join the conference beginning with the 2008 season. [7] Subsequently, the Gateway Football Conference changed its name to the Missouri Valley Football Conference in June 2008. This change aligned the conference with the Missouri Valley Conference, a conference in which five of the nine Missouri Valley Football schools were (and still are) all-sports members. The conferences continue to share the "Missouri Valley" name, and space in the same building in St. Louis, but remain separate administratively. [8]

The University of South Dakota joined as the 10th member in 2012. The University of North Dakota joined as the 11th member in 2020, bringing back the yearly rivalries between North Dakota and both North Dakota State and South Dakota, as well as establishing a potential rivalry with South Dakota State. [9] [10] [11]


Watch the video: Missouri Western State University Live Stream (January 2022).